Lipid oxidation remains a major challenge for the food industry and for researchers. Current methods and knowledge often fail to adequately represent what is consistently observed in real systems. Practical experience strongly suggests the need for new paradigms to fully comprehend lipid oxidation. This viewpoint article aims to mention some critical aspects of current approaches in evaluating lipid oxidation in food systems, and to search for new epistemological and therefore experimental approaches by adopting an interdisciplinary perspective. Herein, suggestions are formulated for a holistic perspective by combining elements ranging from philology to community ecology and systems biology. Lipids undergoing oxidation are compared to ecological communities and living systems, to be considered as a whole, whose patterns change with space and time. As omics is an inductive, hypothesis-generating, circular approach, involving multiparametric analysis, data integration/fusion, and multivariate statistical analysis (both supervised and unsupervised), it could thus provide a useful contribution to better understanding of oxidation and antioxidation processes, enabling laboratory results to be matched with what is observed in real complex foods. Practical applications: There is still a large gap between the wealth of natural compounds with antioxidant activity and the availability of natural products able to prevent rancidity in food products. Moreover, healthy, highly unsaturated fatty acids still require appropriate methods to monitor oxidative spoilage. Dispersed systems and multidomain foods pose new daily challenges regarding oxidation assessment and control. These are critical issues in the food industry, indicating the need to identify a new approach to lipid oxidation in food systems, and this viewpoint article is a contribution to the ongoing debate. A new epistemological paradigm for lipid oxidation in food systems. It consists of the reiteration of hypothesis-generating studies (oxidomics), requiring multiparametric, comprehensive profiling of the oxidation patterns (oxidome) and their changes. The outcome is a progressive improvement in the knowledge of complex systems and the selection of appropriate predisposition, prognostic and diagnostic marker patterns for the oxidation process.

Everything Should Be as Simple as It Can Be. But Not Simpler. Does Food Lipid Oxidation Require an Omics Approach?

Paradiso, Vito M.
;
Pasqualone, Antonella;Summo, Carmine;Caponio, Francesco
2018

Abstract

Lipid oxidation remains a major challenge for the food industry and for researchers. Current methods and knowledge often fail to adequately represent what is consistently observed in real systems. Practical experience strongly suggests the need for new paradigms to fully comprehend lipid oxidation. This viewpoint article aims to mention some critical aspects of current approaches in evaluating lipid oxidation in food systems, and to search for new epistemological and therefore experimental approaches by adopting an interdisciplinary perspective. Herein, suggestions are formulated for a holistic perspective by combining elements ranging from philology to community ecology and systems biology. Lipids undergoing oxidation are compared to ecological communities and living systems, to be considered as a whole, whose patterns change with space and time. As omics is an inductive, hypothesis-generating, circular approach, involving multiparametric analysis, data integration/fusion, and multivariate statistical analysis (both supervised and unsupervised), it could thus provide a useful contribution to better understanding of oxidation and antioxidation processes, enabling laboratory results to be matched with what is observed in real complex foods. Practical applications: There is still a large gap between the wealth of natural compounds with antioxidant activity and the availability of natural products able to prevent rancidity in food products. Moreover, healthy, highly unsaturated fatty acids still require appropriate methods to monitor oxidative spoilage. Dispersed systems and multidomain foods pose new daily challenges regarding oxidation assessment and control. These are critical issues in the food industry, indicating the need to identify a new approach to lipid oxidation in food systems, and this viewpoint article is a contribution to the ongoing debate. A new epistemological paradigm for lipid oxidation in food systems. It consists of the reiteration of hypothesis-generating studies (oxidomics), requiring multiparametric, comprehensive profiling of the oxidation patterns (oxidome) and their changes. The outcome is a progressive improvement in the knowledge of complex systems and the selection of appropriate predisposition, prognostic and diagnostic marker patterns for the oxidation process.
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
Paradiso Viewpoint Everything should be as simple as it can be 2018.pdf

non disponibili

Tipologia: Documento in Versione Editoriale
Licenza: NON PUBBLICO - Accesso privato/ristretto
Dimensione 634.91 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
634.91 kB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11586/226978
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 11
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 7
social impact