An experimental investigation was carried out to assess the fatty acid composition and the degradation level of the covering oil present in canned fish. The most commonly marketed canned fish types were considered (tuna, sardines, anchovies, mackerels), as well as different kinds of covering oil: extra virgin olive oil, olive oil, refined seed oil. A total of 68 samples were analyzed. Two-way analysis of variance, followed by Fisher's Least Significant Difference test for multiple comparisons, and principal component analysis were carried out to compare the effect of both type of oil used and kind of fish on oil quality. The obtained results showed the lowest extent of both hydrolytic and oxidative degradation in samples containing extra virgin olive oil. In particular, the contents of triacylglycerol oligopolymers, imputable to secondary oxidative degradation, were equal to 0.17%, 0.50% and 0.74% for extra virgin olive oil, olive oil and refined seed oil, respectively. Olive oil showed significantly higher hydrolytic degradation, with diacylglycerols equal to 3.37%, but lower oxidative degradation and trans isomers content than refined seed oil. Finally, the type of fish did not seem to influence the extent of oxidative and hydrolytic degradation, with the only exception of sardines' covering oil. This oil, characterized by the highest polyunsaturated fatty acid content, showed the highest values of oxidized triacylglycerols (1.32%) and specific absorption at 232 (K(232), 4.030), indices of primary oxidative degradation.

Fatty acid composition and degradation level of the oils used in canned fish as a function of the different types of fish

CAPONIO, Francesco;SUMMO, CARMINE;PASQUALONE, Antonella;GOMES, Tommaso Francesco
2011

Abstract

An experimental investigation was carried out to assess the fatty acid composition and the degradation level of the covering oil present in canned fish. The most commonly marketed canned fish types were considered (tuna, sardines, anchovies, mackerels), as well as different kinds of covering oil: extra virgin olive oil, olive oil, refined seed oil. A total of 68 samples were analyzed. Two-way analysis of variance, followed by Fisher's Least Significant Difference test for multiple comparisons, and principal component analysis were carried out to compare the effect of both type of oil used and kind of fish on oil quality. The obtained results showed the lowest extent of both hydrolytic and oxidative degradation in samples containing extra virgin olive oil. In particular, the contents of triacylglycerol oligopolymers, imputable to secondary oxidative degradation, were equal to 0.17%, 0.50% and 0.74% for extra virgin olive oil, olive oil and refined seed oil, respectively. Olive oil showed significantly higher hydrolytic degradation, with diacylglycerols equal to 3.37%, but lower oxidative degradation and trans isomers content than refined seed oil. Finally, the type of fish did not seem to influence the extent of oxidative and hydrolytic degradation, with the only exception of sardines' covering oil. This oil, characterized by the highest polyunsaturated fatty acid content, showed the highest values of oxidized triacylglycerols (1.32%) and specific absorption at 232 (K(232), 4.030), indices of primary oxidative degradation.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11586/125490
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