This work aimed to define the microbial consortia that are able to digest gluten into non-toxic and non-immunogenic peptides in the human gastrointestinal tract. Methods: 131 out of 504 tested Bacillus and lactic acid bacteria, specifically Bacillus (64), lactobacilli (63), Pediococcus (1), and Weissella (3), showed strong gastrointestinal resistance and were selected for their PepN, PepI, PepX, PepO, and PepP activities toward synthetic substrates. Based on multivariate analysis, 24 strains were clearly distinct from the other tested strains based on having the highest enzymatic activities. As estimated by RP-HPLC and nano-ESI–MS/MS, 6 cytoplasmic extracts out of 24 selected strains showed the ability to hydrolyze immunogenic epitopes, specifically 57–68 of α9-gliadin, 62–s75 of A-gliadin, 134–153 of γ-gliadin, and 57–89 (33-mer) of α2-gliadin. Live and lysed cells of selected strains were combined into different microbial consortia for hydrolyzing gluten under gastrointestinal conditions. Commercial proteolytic enzymes (Aspergillus oryzae E1, Aspergillus niger E2, Bacillus subtilis Veron HPP, and Veron PS proteases) were also added to each microbial consortium. Consortium activity was evaluated by ELISA tests, RP-HPLC-nano-ESI–MS/MS, and duodenal explants from celiac disease patients. Results: two microbial consortia (Consortium 4: Lactiplantibacillus (Lp.) plantarum DSM33363 and DSM33364, Lacticaseibacillus (Lc.) paracasei DSM33373, Bacillus subtilis DSM33298, and Bacillus pumilus DSM33301; and Consortium 16: Lp. plantarum DSM33363 and DSM33364, Lc. paracasei DSM33373, Limosilactobacillus reuteri DSM33374, Bacillus megaterium DSM33300, B. pumilus DSM33297 and DSM33355), containing commercial enzymes, were able to hydrolyze gluten to non-toxic and non-immunogenic peptides under gastrointestinal conditions. Conclusions: the results of this study provide evidence that selected microbial consortia could potentially improve the digestion of gluten in gluten-sensitive patients by hydrolyzing the immunogenic peptides during gastrointestinal digestion.

Selection of gut-resistant bacteria and construction of microbial consortia for improving gluten digestion under simulated gastrointestinal conditions

De Angelis M.;Siragusa S.;Vacca M.;Di Cagno R.;Cristofori F.;Francavilla R.;Gobbetti M.
2021-01-01

Abstract

This work aimed to define the microbial consortia that are able to digest gluten into non-toxic and non-immunogenic peptides in the human gastrointestinal tract. Methods: 131 out of 504 tested Bacillus and lactic acid bacteria, specifically Bacillus (64), lactobacilli (63), Pediococcus (1), and Weissella (3), showed strong gastrointestinal resistance and were selected for their PepN, PepI, PepX, PepO, and PepP activities toward synthetic substrates. Based on multivariate analysis, 24 strains were clearly distinct from the other tested strains based on having the highest enzymatic activities. As estimated by RP-HPLC and nano-ESI–MS/MS, 6 cytoplasmic extracts out of 24 selected strains showed the ability to hydrolyze immunogenic epitopes, specifically 57–68 of α9-gliadin, 62–s75 of A-gliadin, 134–153 of γ-gliadin, and 57–89 (33-mer) of α2-gliadin. Live and lysed cells of selected strains were combined into different microbial consortia for hydrolyzing gluten under gastrointestinal conditions. Commercial proteolytic enzymes (Aspergillus oryzae E1, Aspergillus niger E2, Bacillus subtilis Veron HPP, and Veron PS proteases) were also added to each microbial consortium. Consortium activity was evaluated by ELISA tests, RP-HPLC-nano-ESI–MS/MS, and duodenal explants from celiac disease patients. Results: two microbial consortia (Consortium 4: Lactiplantibacillus (Lp.) plantarum DSM33363 and DSM33364, Lacticaseibacillus (Lc.) paracasei DSM33373, Bacillus subtilis DSM33298, and Bacillus pumilus DSM33301; and Consortium 16: Lp. plantarum DSM33363 and DSM33364, Lc. paracasei DSM33373, Limosilactobacillus reuteri DSM33374, Bacillus megaterium DSM33300, B. pumilus DSM33297 and DSM33355), containing commercial enzymes, were able to hydrolyze gluten to non-toxic and non-immunogenic peptides under gastrointestinal conditions. Conclusions: the results of this study provide evidence that selected microbial consortia could potentially improve the digestion of gluten in gluten-sensitive patients by hydrolyzing the immunogenic peptides during gastrointestinal digestion.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11586/370533
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