Tinnitus is described as the experience of sound in the absence of any appropriate external stimulus. It can be perceived, in one or both ears or in the head, as a ringing noise or a buzzing, humming, ticking, clicking, roaring, tunes, song or beeping. The exact physiological cause or causes of tinnitus are not know. Indeed, tinnitus is perceived both by individuals with hearing loss and by individuals with normal hearing; no specific organic cause is found and psychological factors may cause or exacerbate tinnitus symptoms. The psychopathological characteristics are not to be considered to represent the cause of tinnitus, but rather constitute one of several features with which it is sometimes associated. This study aimed at investigating the level of psychopathological symptoms and the prevalence of Diagnostic Criteria for Psychosomatic Research (DCPR) in patients with Tinnitus. 54 consecutive outpatients with Tinnitus, referred to Department of Otolaryngology, were recruited between March 2013 and May 2014. Structured Interview for DCPR, Symptom Check List-90-R (SCL-90-R), Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) were used to perform psychometric and clinical assessment. A total of 40 patients (76.9%) met criteria for at least one DCPR and 25 patients (48.1%) had more than one DCPR. The more prevalent DCPR syndromes were Illness Denial (26.9%), Demoralization (23.1%), and Type A behavior (19.2%). Psychosomatic syndromes were variously associated with higher psychopathological distress. There were no significant differences between patients with and without DCPR diagnoses for Tinnitus handicap. There was a significant correlation between trait anxiety and the impact of Tinnitus on daily life (r=. 448, p<0.005). Trait anxiety could increase the impact of Tinnitus on daily life and might play a significant mediating role in the course of Tinnitus.

THE PREVALENCE OF DIAGNOSTIC CRITERIA FOR PSYCHOSOMATIC RESEARCH (DCPR) IN PATIENTS WITH TINNITUS.

De Caro M.
;
Taurino A.
;
Quaranta N.
;
Laera D.
;
2015

Abstract

Tinnitus is described as the experience of sound in the absence of any appropriate external stimulus. It can be perceived, in one or both ears or in the head, as a ringing noise or a buzzing, humming, ticking, clicking, roaring, tunes, song or beeping. The exact physiological cause or causes of tinnitus are not know. Indeed, tinnitus is perceived both by individuals with hearing loss and by individuals with normal hearing; no specific organic cause is found and psychological factors may cause or exacerbate tinnitus symptoms. The psychopathological characteristics are not to be considered to represent the cause of tinnitus, but rather constitute one of several features with which it is sometimes associated. This study aimed at investigating the level of psychopathological symptoms and the prevalence of Diagnostic Criteria for Psychosomatic Research (DCPR) in patients with Tinnitus. 54 consecutive outpatients with Tinnitus, referred to Department of Otolaryngology, were recruited between March 2013 and May 2014. Structured Interview for DCPR, Symptom Check List-90-R (SCL-90-R), Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) were used to perform psychometric and clinical assessment. A total of 40 patients (76.9%) met criteria for at least one DCPR and 25 patients (48.1%) had more than one DCPR. The more prevalent DCPR syndromes were Illness Denial (26.9%), Demoralization (23.1%), and Type A behavior (19.2%). Psychosomatic syndromes were variously associated with higher psychopathological distress. There were no significant differences between patients with and without DCPR diagnoses for Tinnitus handicap. There was a significant correlation between trait anxiety and the impact of Tinnitus on daily life (r=. 448, p<0.005). Trait anxiety could increase the impact of Tinnitus on daily life and might play a significant mediating role in the course of Tinnitus.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11586/248781
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