Tinnitus is described as the experience of sound in the absence of any appropriate external stimulus. It can be perceived, in one or both ears or in the head, as a ringing noise or a buzzing, humming, ticking, clicking, roaring, tunes, song or beeping. Tinnitus prevalence is estimated, in adult population, at 8-15%, depending on the definition, and increases with age. During recent years, the relationship between psychological well-being and tinnitus has been emphasized. The aim of this study is to compare the levels of psychopathology among patients with tinnitus and healthy subjects. 54 consecutive outpatients with Tinnitus, referred to Department of Otolaryngology, were compared with healthy subjects. Structured Interview for DCPR, Symptom Check List-90-R (SCL-90-R), Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) were used to perform psychometric and clinical assessment. A total of 40 patients with tinnitus (76.9%) respects criteria for at least one DCPR and 25 patients (48.1%) had more than one DCPR. The more prevalent DCPR syndromes, in experimental group were Illness Denial (26.9%), Demoralization (23.1%), and Somatization (19.2%), while in the control group the more prevalent syndrome was Irritable Mood (12.5%). The comparision between two groups in SCL-90 questionnaire, shows: absence of symptomatology in the control group and presence of any symptoms in the experimental group, in particular Depression (61.33) and Phobic anxiety (61.27%). Depression could increase the impact of Tinnitus on daily life and might play a significant mediating role in the course of Tinnitus.

PSYCHOLOGICAL SYMPTOMS IN TINNITUS PATIENTS

Maria De Caro;Alessandro Taurino
;
Nicola Quaranta
;
Domenico Laera
;
2017

Abstract

Tinnitus is described as the experience of sound in the absence of any appropriate external stimulus. It can be perceived, in one or both ears or in the head, as a ringing noise or a buzzing, humming, ticking, clicking, roaring, tunes, song or beeping. Tinnitus prevalence is estimated, in adult population, at 8-15%, depending on the definition, and increases with age. During recent years, the relationship between psychological well-being and tinnitus has been emphasized. The aim of this study is to compare the levels of psychopathology among patients with tinnitus and healthy subjects. 54 consecutive outpatients with Tinnitus, referred to Department of Otolaryngology, were compared with healthy subjects. Structured Interview for DCPR, Symptom Check List-90-R (SCL-90-R), Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) were used to perform psychometric and clinical assessment. A total of 40 patients with tinnitus (76.9%) respects criteria for at least one DCPR and 25 patients (48.1%) had more than one DCPR. The more prevalent DCPR syndromes, in experimental group were Illness Denial (26.9%), Demoralization (23.1%), and Somatization (19.2%), while in the control group the more prevalent syndrome was Irritable Mood (12.5%). The comparision between two groups in SCL-90 questionnaire, shows: absence of symptomatology in the control group and presence of any symptoms in the experimental group, in particular Depression (61.33) and Phobic anxiety (61.27%). Depression could increase the impact of Tinnitus on daily life and might play a significant mediating role in the course of Tinnitus.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11586/248767
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