In sea turtles the cervical sinus and jugular vein is commonly used for blood collection and administration of bolus fluid therapy, but placement and maintenance of intravascular catheters in these sites is difficult. In these species radiohumeral venous plexus catheterization is commonly used after a deep cutdown incision in the dorsal surface of the fore flippers. For this painful and stressful procedure, sedation or anaesthesia may be necessary; moreover, these techniques can be dangerous in critically ill patients. In this study the authors describe an atraumatic and easy procedure for placement and maintenance of cephalic vein catheterization with the aid of ultrasound guidance. The ultrasound examinations were performed with a GE Logiq 400 machine connected to a multifrequency (7–11MHz) linear array transducer with the frequency set at 11MHz. Turtles were placed on foam-rubber blocks on an operating table; one forelimb was extended and restrained manually. In order to find the cephalic vein, longitudinal and transversal colour doppler ultrasonographic examination of the flipper’s dorsal surface was made, along the caudal margin of the humerus and ulna. Once the vein was located, a needle catheter (20-22 gauge, depending on the size of the animal) was inserted in the skin beneath the ultrasound probe, distoproximal and dorsoventral, inclined at 10-15 degrees to skin surface. The catheter’s progress was monitored with ultrasound until successfully inserted into the vein. After placement, the catheter was secured to the skin with a suture (two single surgical stitches with 2-0/1-0 braided polyester or polyamide monofilament), and an injection cap was connected to the catheter hub. When it was necessary to maintain the catheter in situ for an extended period, it was covered and secured with noncompressing self-adhesive elastic bandage that encompassed the flipper. The authors think that an ultrasound guided catheterization of the cephalic vein allows an easy, atraumatic and durable vascular access for drug administration, rehydration and emergency therapy in sea turtles, compared with other previously described techniques.

Ultrasound guided vascular catheterization in sea turtles

DI BELLO, Antonio Vito Francesco;VALASTRO, CARMELA;
2008

Abstract

In sea turtles the cervical sinus and jugular vein is commonly used for blood collection and administration of bolus fluid therapy, but placement and maintenance of intravascular catheters in these sites is difficult. In these species radiohumeral venous plexus catheterization is commonly used after a deep cutdown incision in the dorsal surface of the fore flippers. For this painful and stressful procedure, sedation or anaesthesia may be necessary; moreover, these techniques can be dangerous in critically ill patients. In this study the authors describe an atraumatic and easy procedure for placement and maintenance of cephalic vein catheterization with the aid of ultrasound guidance. The ultrasound examinations were performed with a GE Logiq 400 machine connected to a multifrequency (7–11MHz) linear array transducer with the frequency set at 11MHz. Turtles were placed on foam-rubber blocks on an operating table; one forelimb was extended and restrained manually. In order to find the cephalic vein, longitudinal and transversal colour doppler ultrasonographic examination of the flipper’s dorsal surface was made, along the caudal margin of the humerus and ulna. Once the vein was located, a needle catheter (20-22 gauge, depending on the size of the animal) was inserted in the skin beneath the ultrasound probe, distoproximal and dorsoventral, inclined at 10-15 degrees to skin surface. The catheter’s progress was monitored with ultrasound until successfully inserted into the vein. After placement, the catheter was secured to the skin with a suture (two single surgical stitches with 2-0/1-0 braided polyester or polyamide monofilament), and an injection cap was connected to the catheter hub. When it was necessary to maintain the catheter in situ for an extended period, it was covered and secured with noncompressing self-adhesive elastic bandage that encompassed the flipper. The authors think that an ultrasound guided catheterization of the cephalic vein allows an easy, atraumatic and durable vascular access for drug administration, rehydration and emergency therapy in sea turtles, compared with other previously described techniques.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11586/137006
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