Schizophrenia and affective spectrum disorders (ASD) typically begin in adolescence or early adulthood. The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying these disorders are still not fully understood, and recent studies have suggested an involvement of dysfunctions in cardiometabolic and neuroendocrine systems at the onset of both disorders. In this context, we aimed to assess thyroid function, prolactin level, glucose metabolism, and lipid profile in drug naive adolescents, comparing patients with first episode of schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SSD) and patients with ASD. We performed a retrospective chart review from inpatients aged from ten to eighteen years, referred to Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Unit of University of Bari “Aldo Moro” over a period of 4 years, with diagnosis of SSD (n=30) or ASD (n=22), according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders-fifth edition (DSM-5) criteria. Data on serum prolactin, glucose, insulin, total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, thyroid stimulating hormone, free triiodothyronin, and free thyroxin were collected, and the insulin resistance (IR) indexes “HOMA1-IR“ and “HOMA2-IR” were calculated. The multivariable linear regression models, adjusting for potential confounding factors (age, sex, and BMI), showed HOMA1-IR (p=0.001), HOMA2-IR (p=0.002), glucose (p=0.004), insulin (p=0.004) and free thyroxin (p<0.001) values higher in the SSD group than in ASD. No others significant differences were found. Our findings suggest the need for a metabolic and endocrine screening at the onset of SSD and ASD, particularly for indexes of IR, that is a testable and treatable risk factor for cardiometabolic diseases. Further studies are required to better understand the role of endocrinological and metabolic dysfunctions at the onset of severe mental illness also considering influencing factors as age, gender, and BMI.

Glucose Metabolism, Thyroid Function, and Prolactin Level in Adolescent Patients With First Episode of Schizophrenia and Affective Disorders

Petruzzelli M. G.
Conceptualization
;
Marzulli L.
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
Giannico O. V.
Software
;
Furente F.
Data Curation
;
Margari M.
Investigation
;
Matera E.
Writing – Review & Editing
;
Margari F.
Supervision
2020

Abstract

Schizophrenia and affective spectrum disorders (ASD) typically begin in adolescence or early adulthood. The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying these disorders are still not fully understood, and recent studies have suggested an involvement of dysfunctions in cardiometabolic and neuroendocrine systems at the onset of both disorders. In this context, we aimed to assess thyroid function, prolactin level, glucose metabolism, and lipid profile in drug naive adolescents, comparing patients with first episode of schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SSD) and patients with ASD. We performed a retrospective chart review from inpatients aged from ten to eighteen years, referred to Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Unit of University of Bari “Aldo Moro” over a period of 4 years, with diagnosis of SSD (n=30) or ASD (n=22), according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders-fifth edition (DSM-5) criteria. Data on serum prolactin, glucose, insulin, total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, thyroid stimulating hormone, free triiodothyronin, and free thyroxin were collected, and the insulin resistance (IR) indexes “HOMA1-IR“ and “HOMA2-IR” were calculated. The multivariable linear regression models, adjusting for potential confounding factors (age, sex, and BMI), showed HOMA1-IR (p=0.001), HOMA2-IR (p=0.002), glucose (p=0.004), insulin (p=0.004) and free thyroxin (p<0.001) values higher in the SSD group than in ASD. No others significant differences were found. Our findings suggest the need for a metabolic and endocrine screening at the onset of SSD and ASD, particularly for indexes of IR, that is a testable and treatable risk factor for cardiometabolic diseases. Further studies are required to better understand the role of endocrinological and metabolic dysfunctions at the onset of severe mental illness also considering influencing factors as age, gender, and BMI.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11586/315874
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 3
  • Scopus 5
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 5
social impact