Legionella is the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, a flu-like illness normally acquired following inhalation or aspiration of contaminated water aerosols. Our recent studies revealed that climatic parameters can increase the number of reported cases of community-acquired Legionnaires' disease. Here, we evaluated the presence of Legionella in water networks and the distribution of Legionnaires' disease cases associated with touristic-recreational facilities in the Apulia region (southern Italy) during the period 2001-2017 using geostatistical and climatic analyses. Geostatistical analysis data revealed that the area with the highest concentration of Legionella in water systems also had the greatest number of cases of Legionnaires' disease associated with touristic-recreational facilities. Climatic analysis showed that higher daily temperature excursion (difference between maximum and minimum temperature) on the day of sampling was more often associated with Legionella-positive samples than Legionella-negative samples. In addition, our data highlighted an increased risk of Legionnaires' disease with increases in precipitation and average temperature and with decreases in daily temperature excursion (difference between maximum and minimum temperature over the course of 24 h in the days of incubation period of disease) and minimum temperature. Healthcare professionals should be aware of this phenomenon and be particularly vigilant for cases of community-acquired pneumonia during such climatic conditions and among the tourist population. The innovative geo-statistical approach used in this study could be applied in other contexts when evaluating the effects of climatic conditions on the incidence of Legionella infections.

Legionella and legionellosis in touristic-recreational facilities: Influence of climate factors and geostatistical analysis in Southern Italy (2001-2017)

De Giglio, Osvalda;Diella, Giusy;Calia, Carla;Campanale, Carmen;Pousis, Chrysovalentinos;Rutigliano, Serafina;Triggiano, Francesco;Caggiano, Giuseppina;Montagna, Maria Teresa
2019-01-01

Abstract

Legionella is the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, a flu-like illness normally acquired following inhalation or aspiration of contaminated water aerosols. Our recent studies revealed that climatic parameters can increase the number of reported cases of community-acquired Legionnaires' disease. Here, we evaluated the presence of Legionella in water networks and the distribution of Legionnaires' disease cases associated with touristic-recreational facilities in the Apulia region (southern Italy) during the period 2001-2017 using geostatistical and climatic analyses. Geostatistical analysis data revealed that the area with the highest concentration of Legionella in water systems also had the greatest number of cases of Legionnaires' disease associated with touristic-recreational facilities. Climatic analysis showed that higher daily temperature excursion (difference between maximum and minimum temperature) on the day of sampling was more often associated with Legionella-positive samples than Legionella-negative samples. In addition, our data highlighted an increased risk of Legionnaires' disease with increases in precipitation and average temperature and with decreases in daily temperature excursion (difference between maximum and minimum temperature over the course of 24 h in the days of incubation period of disease) and minimum temperature. Healthcare professionals should be aware of this phenomenon and be particularly vigilant for cases of community-acquired pneumonia during such climatic conditions and among the tourist population. The innovative geo-statistical approach used in this study could be applied in other contexts when evaluating the effects of climatic conditions on the incidence of Legionella infections.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11586/242772
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