Adenoviruses are important pathogens of humans and animals. Bats have been recognized as potential reservoirs of novel viruses, with some viruses being regarded as a possible zoonotic threat to humans. In this study, we report the detection and analysis of adenoviruses from different bat species in northern Italy. Upon sequence and phylogenetic analysis, based on a short diagnostic fragment of the highly-conserved DNA polymerase gene, we identified potential novel candidate adenovirus species, including an avian-like adenovirus strain. An adenovirus isolate was obtained in simian cell lines from the carcass of a Pipistrellus kuhlii, and the complete genome sequence was reconstructed using deep sequencing technologies. The virus displayed high nucleotide identity and virtually the same genome organization as the Pipistrellus pipistrellus strain PPV1, isolated in Germany in 2007. Gathering data on epidemiology and the genetic diversity of bat adenoviruses may be helpful to better understand their evolution in the mammalian and avian hosts.

Surveillance for adenoviruses in bats in Italy

Diakoudi G.;Lanave G.;Larocca V.;Losurdo M.;Decaro N.;Martella V.;
2019

Abstract

Adenoviruses are important pathogens of humans and animals. Bats have been recognized as potential reservoirs of novel viruses, with some viruses being regarded as a possible zoonotic threat to humans. In this study, we report the detection and analysis of adenoviruses from different bat species in northern Italy. Upon sequence and phylogenetic analysis, based on a short diagnostic fragment of the highly-conserved DNA polymerase gene, we identified potential novel candidate adenovirus species, including an avian-like adenovirus strain. An adenovirus isolate was obtained in simian cell lines from the carcass of a Pipistrellus kuhlii, and the complete genome sequence was reconstructed using deep sequencing technologies. The virus displayed high nucleotide identity and virtually the same genome organization as the Pipistrellus pipistrellus strain PPV1, isolated in Germany in 2007. Gathering data on epidemiology and the genetic diversity of bat adenoviruses may be helpful to better understand their evolution in the mammalian and avian hosts.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11586/235165
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