We evaluated the epidemiology of Candida bloodstream infections in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of an Italian university hospital during a 9-year period as a means of quantifying the burden of infection and identifying emerging trends. Clinical data were searched for in the microbiological laboratory database. For comparative purposes, we performed a review of NICU candidemia. Forty-one candidemia cases were reviewed (overall incidence, 3.0 per 100 admissions). Candida parapsilosis sensu stricto (58.5%) and C. albicans (34.1%) were the most common species recovered. A variable drift through years was observed; in 2015, 75% of the cases were caused by non-albicans species. The duration of NICU hospitalization of patients with non-albicans was significantly longer than in those with C. albicans (median days, 10 versus 12). Patients with non-albicans species were more likely to have parenteral nutrition than those with C. albicans (96.3% versus 71.4%). Candida albicans was the dominant species in Europe and America (median, 55% and 60%; resp.); non-albicans species predominate in Asia (75%). Significant geographic variation is evident among cases of candidemia in different parts of the world, recognizing the importance of epidemiological data to facilitate the treatment.

Candidemia in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: A Retrospective, Observational Survey and Analysis of Literature Data

CAGGIANO, GIUSEPPINA
;
LOVERO, GRAZIA;DE GIGLIO, OSVALDA;BARBUTI, Giovanna;LAFORGIA, Nicola;MONTAGNA, Maria Teresa
2017

Abstract

We evaluated the epidemiology of Candida bloodstream infections in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of an Italian university hospital during a 9-year period as a means of quantifying the burden of infection and identifying emerging trends. Clinical data were searched for in the microbiological laboratory database. For comparative purposes, we performed a review of NICU candidemia. Forty-one candidemia cases were reviewed (overall incidence, 3.0 per 100 admissions). Candida parapsilosis sensu stricto (58.5%) and C. albicans (34.1%) were the most common species recovered. A variable drift through years was observed; in 2015, 75% of the cases were caused by non-albicans species. The duration of NICU hospitalization of patients with non-albicans was significantly longer than in those with C. albicans (median days, 10 versus 12). Patients with non-albicans species were more likely to have parenteral nutrition than those with C. albicans (96.3% versus 71.4%). Candida albicans was the dominant species in Europe and America (median, 55% and 60%; resp.); non-albicans species predominate in Asia (75%). Significant geographic variation is evident among cases of candidemia in different parts of the world, recognizing the importance of epidemiological data to facilitate the treatment.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11586/199203
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