The metaphor of remigium alarum used by Verg. Aen. 6, 19 to describe the flight of Daedalus is the starting point for an investigation into the exegetical tradition which grew up on this myth from Late Antiquity to the Middle Ages. Particular attention is given to some variants and the rationalizing version of the story, which is attested and constantly renewed from Classical Antiquity to the Latin Medieval Commentaries on the Divine Comedy; accordingto it, Daedalus and Icarus didn’t fly on a pair of makeshift wings but sailed off in a boat, by which they seemed to be flying. A new critical text of the scholium of Servius Danielis to Verg. Aen. 1, 14 is therefore provided and medieval notes on Sen. Oed. 882 s.14 are examined as well as several unpublished scholia occurring in the supposed Commentary of Remigius of Auxerre on Vergil and the so-called Vulgate Commentary on Ov. met. 8, 159 s. These glosses report original mythographic informations about the Labyrinth and Daedalus. Their origine and fortune are here investigated.

Le ali del mito: Dedalo in glosse fra Tardoantico e Medioevo

LAGIOIA, ALESSANDRO
2014

Abstract

The metaphor of remigium alarum used by Verg. Aen. 6, 19 to describe the flight of Daedalus is the starting point for an investigation into the exegetical tradition which grew up on this myth from Late Antiquity to the Middle Ages. Particular attention is given to some variants and the rationalizing version of the story, which is attested and constantly renewed from Classical Antiquity to the Latin Medieval Commentaries on the Divine Comedy; accordingto it, Daedalus and Icarus didn’t fly on a pair of makeshift wings but sailed off in a boat, by which they seemed to be flying. A new critical text of the scholium of Servius Danielis to Verg. Aen. 1, 14 is therefore provided and medieval notes on Sen. Oed. 882 s.14 are examined as well as several unpublished scholia occurring in the supposed Commentary of Remigius of Auxerre on Vergil and the so-called Vulgate Commentary on Ov. met. 8, 159 s. These glosses report original mythographic informations about the Labyrinth and Daedalus. Their origine and fortune are here investigated.
978-88-6572-131-5
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11586/189724
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