Astroviruses are notable agents of gastroenteritis in many mammalian and avian hosts. Astroviruses are nonenveloped RNA small, round, viruses (SRVs) with a single-stranded, positive sense RNA of 6.1 to 7.9 kb (1). The genome contains 2 nonstructural genes, open reading frame (ORF) 1a and 1b, and a capsid gene, ORF2, with short 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions. Human astroviruses, a major cause of gastroenteritis, are classified in the human astrovirus species, comprising 8 serotypes (1). Recently, astroviruses genetically unrelated to canonical human astroviruses have been identified in human stools in several countries. These unusual astroviruses form 2 main genetic clades. One clade contains MLB1, MLB2, and MLB3 (2–4). The second clade contains VA1, VA2, VA3 (also known as HMO-C, HMO-A, and HMO-B, respectively) and VA4 (5,6). More recently, a VA1/HMO-C–like virus was detected in brain tissue from an immunocompromised child with encephalitis (7). The discoveries of these viruses provide novel candidate agents of human disease and raise concerns inherent of possible zoonotic implications. Here we describe the detection and genome characterization of MLB1-like astrovirus in a 4-year-old male child hospitalized with severe gastroenteritis during January 2007 at the University Hospital of Parma, Italy. Clinical signs included vomiting and severe diarrhea, with moderate dehydration. The child was treated with rehydration and maintenance therapy (balanced glucose-electrolyte solutions) and completely recovered after 3 days.

MLB1 astrovirus in children with gastroenteritis, Italy

Elia, G;Martella, V.;Buonavoglia, C.
2014-01-01

Abstract

Astroviruses are notable agents of gastroenteritis in many mammalian and avian hosts. Astroviruses are nonenveloped RNA small, round, viruses (SRVs) with a single-stranded, positive sense RNA of 6.1 to 7.9 kb (1). The genome contains 2 nonstructural genes, open reading frame (ORF) 1a and 1b, and a capsid gene, ORF2, with short 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions. Human astroviruses, a major cause of gastroenteritis, are classified in the human astrovirus species, comprising 8 serotypes (1). Recently, astroviruses genetically unrelated to canonical human astroviruses have been identified in human stools in several countries. These unusual astroviruses form 2 main genetic clades. One clade contains MLB1, MLB2, and MLB3 (2–4). The second clade contains VA1, VA2, VA3 (also known as HMO-C, HMO-A, and HMO-B, respectively) and VA4 (5,6). More recently, a VA1/HMO-C–like virus was detected in brain tissue from an immunocompromised child with encephalitis (7). The discoveries of these viruses provide novel candidate agents of human disease and raise concerns inherent of possible zoonotic implications. Here we describe the detection and genome characterization of MLB1-like astrovirus in a 4-year-old male child hospitalized with severe gastroenteritis during January 2007 at the University Hospital of Parma, Italy. Clinical signs included vomiting and severe diarrhea, with moderate dehydration. The child was treated with rehydration and maintenance therapy (balanced glucose-electrolyte solutions) and completely recovered after 3 days.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11586/136290
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 13
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 13
social impact