Objective. Colorectal carcinoma is an important cause of death in inflammatory bowel diseases, thus requiring surveillance for dysplasia in long-standing ulcerative colitis (UC). Females show a lower incidence probably related to hormonal factors; therefore, a role of estrogen receptors (ERs) has been supposed in carcinoma-associated colitis (CAC) development. Our aim was to identify ER beta/alpha expression in long-lasting pancolitis through each grade of dysplasia to carcinoma and, furthermore, to investigate the simultaneous epithelial apoptosis/proliferation. Materials and methods. Forty-eight patients affected by long-lasting pancolitis were retrospectively investigated. Samples were divided into four groups: UC, low-grade dysplasia/high-grade dysplasia (UC-HGD), and CAC. Normal colon samples were used as controls. ER-beta, ER-alpha, Ki-67, and TUNEL expression (labeling/H index) were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Results. ER-beta expression revealed an impressive reduction in CAC (10.4 ± 5.1; p < 0.001) compared to controls and UC (34.3 ± 3.1 and 26.8 ± 7.8, respectively), meanwhile ER-beta level in LGD (29.4 ± 3.7) was comparable to UC. As far ER-beta/ER-alpha mean value ratio revealed a progressive reduction. Ki67 demonstrated a progressive significant increase from UC until CAC (37.9 ± 6.4 < 45.7 ± 6.2 < 60.6 ± 5.2 < 71.1 ± 5.1; p < 0.001). Apoptotic index (TUNEL) revealed a strong fall in UC-HGD and CAC. Conclusions. ER-beta fall could be considered as a biomarker of UC-dysplasia progression. It occurs in HGD and overt neoplasia, while in LGD shows a normal expression. At the moment, we are unable to use this tool in the clinical practice to predict tumor progression, but it would be appropriate to encourage ER expression investigations in large samples for the interesting perspectives of application.

The sharp decline of beta estrogen receptors expression in long-lasting ulcerative-associated carcinoma.

PRINCIPI, MARIABEATRICE;PISCITELLI, Domenico;LOSURDO G;DI LEO, Alfredo
2015-01-01

Abstract

Objective. Colorectal carcinoma is an important cause of death in inflammatory bowel diseases, thus requiring surveillance for dysplasia in long-standing ulcerative colitis (UC). Females show a lower incidence probably related to hormonal factors; therefore, a role of estrogen receptors (ERs) has been supposed in carcinoma-associated colitis (CAC) development. Our aim was to identify ER beta/alpha expression in long-lasting pancolitis through each grade of dysplasia to carcinoma and, furthermore, to investigate the simultaneous epithelial apoptosis/proliferation. Materials and methods. Forty-eight patients affected by long-lasting pancolitis were retrospectively investigated. Samples were divided into four groups: UC, low-grade dysplasia/high-grade dysplasia (UC-HGD), and CAC. Normal colon samples were used as controls. ER-beta, ER-alpha, Ki-67, and TUNEL expression (labeling/H index) were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Results. ER-beta expression revealed an impressive reduction in CAC (10.4 ± 5.1; p < 0.001) compared to controls and UC (34.3 ± 3.1 and 26.8 ± 7.8, respectively), meanwhile ER-beta level in LGD (29.4 ± 3.7) was comparable to UC. As far ER-beta/ER-alpha mean value ratio revealed a progressive reduction. Ki67 demonstrated a progressive significant increase from UC until CAC (37.9 ± 6.4 < 45.7 ± 6.2 < 60.6 ± 5.2 < 71.1 ± 5.1; p < 0.001). Apoptotic index (TUNEL) revealed a strong fall in UC-HGD and CAC. Conclusions. ER-beta fall could be considered as a biomarker of UC-dysplasia progression. It occurs in HGD and overt neoplasia, while in LGD shows a normal expression. At the moment, we are unable to use this tool in the clinical practice to predict tumor progression, but it would be appropriate to encourage ER expression investigations in large samples for the interesting perspectives of application.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11586/65746
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