Background: Vector-borne diseases (VBDs) represent an emerging global threat to public health due to the geographical expansion of arthropod vectors. The study aims to assess the seroprevalence of selected vector-borne pathogens (VBPs) in different groups of outdoor workers and the occupational risk factors for exposure to arthropod bites.Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on 170 workers recruited in two different regions of southern Italy, including farmers, forestry workers, veterinarians, geologists/agronomists and administrative employees, and tested for IgG antibodies against Bartonella henselae, Borrelia spp. Coxiella burnetii and Rickettsia conorii, using a chemiluminescent immunoassay (CLIA). The relationship among job characteristics, tick exposure and the prevalence of seropositive subjects for each pathogen was investigated by applying categorical principal component analysis (CATPCA).Results: A high seroprevalence for C. burnetii (30.0%) and R. conorii (15.3%) was reported, mainly in farmers (67.7% and 54.8%, respectively) and forestry workers (29.0% and 16.1%, respectively), while a low prevalence was observed for B. henselae and Borrelia spp. (8.8% and 4.1%, respectively). The regression equation by CATPCA was significant for C. burnetii and R. conorii (P < 0.001), showing a positive association with job, tick bite exposure, working area and contact with animals.Conclusions: These findings highlight the need of activating an appropriate occupational health response for minimizing the risk of arthropod vector exposure in workplaces, considering specific preventive measures in particular in high-risk job categories.

Seroprevalence of vector-borne pathogens in outdoor workers from southern Italy and associated occupational risk factors

Stufano, Angela;Iatta, Roberta
;
Sgroi, Giovanni;Jahantigh, Hamid Reza;Cagnazzo, Francesco;Lucchese, Guglielmo;Loconsole, Daniela;Centrone, Francesca;Mendoza-Roldan, Jairo Alfonso;Chironna, Maria;Otranto, Domenico;Lovreglio, Piero
2022-01-01

Abstract

Background: Vector-borne diseases (VBDs) represent an emerging global threat to public health due to the geographical expansion of arthropod vectors. The study aims to assess the seroprevalence of selected vector-borne pathogens (VBPs) in different groups of outdoor workers and the occupational risk factors for exposure to arthropod bites.Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on 170 workers recruited in two different regions of southern Italy, including farmers, forestry workers, veterinarians, geologists/agronomists and administrative employees, and tested for IgG antibodies against Bartonella henselae, Borrelia spp. Coxiella burnetii and Rickettsia conorii, using a chemiluminescent immunoassay (CLIA). The relationship among job characteristics, tick exposure and the prevalence of seropositive subjects for each pathogen was investigated by applying categorical principal component analysis (CATPCA).Results: A high seroprevalence for C. burnetii (30.0%) and R. conorii (15.3%) was reported, mainly in farmers (67.7% and 54.8%, respectively) and forestry workers (29.0% and 16.1%, respectively), while a low prevalence was observed for B. henselae and Borrelia spp. (8.8% and 4.1%, respectively). The regression equation by CATPCA was significant for C. burnetii and R. conorii (P < 0.001), showing a positive association with job, tick bite exposure, working area and contact with animals.Conclusions: These findings highlight the need of activating an appropriate occupational health response for minimizing the risk of arthropod vector exposure in workplaces, considering specific preventive measures in particular in high-risk job categories.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11586/409701
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