The high volatility, water-immiscibility, and light/oxygen-sensitivity of most aroma compounds represent a challenge to their incorporation in liquid consumer products. Current encapsulation methods entail the use of petroleum-based materials, initiators, and crosslinkers as well as mixing, heating, and purification steps. Hence, more efficient and eco-friendly approaches to encapsulation must be sought. Herein, we propose a simple method by making use of a pre-formed amphiphilic polymer and employing the Hansen Solubility Parameters approach to determine which fragrances could be encapsulated by spontaneous coacervation in water. The coacervates do not precipitate as solids but they remain suspended as colloidally stable liquid microcapsules, as demonstrated by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. The effective encapsulation of fragrance is proven through confocal Raman spectroscopy, while the structure of the capsules is investigated by means of cryo FIB/SEM, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and small-angle X-ray scattering.

The high volatility, water-immiscibility, and light/oxygen-sensitivity of most aroma compounds represent a challenge to their incorporation in liquid consumer products. Current encapsulation methods entail the use of petroleum-based materials, initiators, and crosslinkers as well as mixing, heating, and purification steps. Hence, more efficient and eco-friendly approaches to encapsulation must be sought. Herein, we propose a simple method by making use of a pre-formed amphiphilic polymer and employing the Hansen Solubility Parameters approach to determine which fragrances could be encapsulated by spontaneous coacervation in water. The coacervates do not precipitate as solids but they remain suspended as colloidally stable liquid microcapsules, as demonstrated by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. The effective encapsulation of fragrance is proven through confocal Raman spectroscopy, while the structure of the capsules is investigated by means of cryo FIB/SEM, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and small-angle X-ray scattering.

Rational Design of Sustainable Liquid Microcapsules for Spontaneous Fragrance Encapsulation

Gerardo Palazzo;
2021-01-01

Abstract

The high volatility, water-immiscibility, and light/oxygen-sensitivity of most aroma compounds represent a challenge to their incorporation in liquid consumer products. Current encapsulation methods entail the use of petroleum-based materials, initiators, and crosslinkers as well as mixing, heating, and purification steps. Hence, more efficient and eco-friendly approaches to encapsulation must be sought. Herein, we propose a simple method by making use of a pre-formed amphiphilic polymer and employing the Hansen Solubility Parameters approach to determine which fragrances could be encapsulated by spontaneous coacervation in water. The coacervates do not precipitate as solids but they remain suspended as colloidally stable liquid microcapsules, as demonstrated by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. The effective encapsulation of fragrance is proven through confocal Raman spectroscopy, while the structure of the capsules is investigated by means of cryo FIB/SEM, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and small-angle X-ray scattering.
2021
The high volatility, water-immiscibility, and light/oxygen-sensitivity of most aroma compounds represent a challenge to their incorporation in liquid consumer products. Current encapsulation methods entail the use of petroleum-based materials, initiators, and crosslinkers as well as mixing, heating, and purification steps. Hence, more efficient and eco-friendly approaches to encapsulation must be sought. Herein, we propose a simple method by making use of a pre-formed amphiphilic polymer and employing the Hansen Solubility Parameters approach to determine which fragrances could be encapsulated by spontaneous coacervation in water. The coacervates do not precipitate as solids but they remain suspended as colloidally stable liquid microcapsules, as demonstrated by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. The effective encapsulation of fragrance is proven through confocal Raman spectroscopy, while the structure of the capsules is investigated by means of cryo FIB/SEM, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and small-angle X-ray scattering.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11586/390782
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