Diagnostic imaging has significantly grown over the last thirty years as indispensable support for diagnostic, prognostic, therapeutic and monitoring procedures of human diseases. This study explored the effects of low-dose X-ray medical diagnostics exposure on female fertility. To aim this, cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) recovered from the ovaries of juvenile sheep and human ovaries were used as complementary models for in vitro studies. In the sheep model, the effects of low-dose X-rays on oocyte viability and developmental competence were evaluated. In human ovaries originated from two age group (21–25 and 33–36 years old) subjects with gender dysphoria, X-rays effects on tissue morphology, follicular density and expression of apoptosis-related (NOXA, PUMA, Bcl2, Bak, γH2AX) and cell cycle-related genes (p21 and ki67) were investigated. It was noted that in sheep, the minimum dose of 10 mGy did not influence most of examined parameters at oocyte and embryo levels, whereas 50 and 100 mGy X-ray exposure reduced oocyte bioenergetic/oxidative activity but without any visible effects on oocyte and embryo development. In addition, blastocyst bioenergetic/oxidative status was reduced with all used doses. Overall data on human ovaries showed that low-dose X-rays, similarly as in sheep, did not alter any of examined parameters. However, in women belonging to the 33–36 year group, significantly reduced follicular density was observed after exposure to 50 and 100 mGy, and increased NOXA and Bax expression after exposure at 50 mGy. In conclusion, used low-doses of X-ray exposure, which resemble doses used in medical diagnostics, produce weak damaging effects on female fertility with increased susceptibility in advanced age.

Effects of low-dose X-ray medical diagnostics on female gonads: Insights from large animal oocytes and human ovaries as complementary models

Martino N. A.;Vicenti R.;Marzano G.;Mastrorocco A.;Lacalandra G. M.;Dell'Aquila M. E.
2021-01-01

Abstract

Diagnostic imaging has significantly grown over the last thirty years as indispensable support for diagnostic, prognostic, therapeutic and monitoring procedures of human diseases. This study explored the effects of low-dose X-ray medical diagnostics exposure on female fertility. To aim this, cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) recovered from the ovaries of juvenile sheep and human ovaries were used as complementary models for in vitro studies. In the sheep model, the effects of low-dose X-rays on oocyte viability and developmental competence were evaluated. In human ovaries originated from two age group (21–25 and 33–36 years old) subjects with gender dysphoria, X-rays effects on tissue morphology, follicular density and expression of apoptosis-related (NOXA, PUMA, Bcl2, Bak, γH2AX) and cell cycle-related genes (p21 and ki67) were investigated. It was noted that in sheep, the minimum dose of 10 mGy did not influence most of examined parameters at oocyte and embryo levels, whereas 50 and 100 mGy X-ray exposure reduced oocyte bioenergetic/oxidative activity but without any visible effects on oocyte and embryo development. In addition, blastocyst bioenergetic/oxidative status was reduced with all used doses. Overall data on human ovaries showed that low-dose X-rays, similarly as in sheep, did not alter any of examined parameters. However, in women belonging to the 33–36 year group, significantly reduced follicular density was observed after exposure to 50 and 100 mGy, and increased NOXA and Bax expression after exposure at 50 mGy. In conclusion, used low-doses of X-ray exposure, which resemble doses used in medical diagnostics, produce weak damaging effects on female fertility with increased susceptibility in advanced age.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11586/379896
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