Hyperparathyroidism is a metabolic disorder characterized by the excessive production of the parathyroid hormone. The diagnosis is based on clinical and laboratory data. In most cases the only treatment is surgery and a correct preoperatory localization of the hyperfunctioning parathyroid gland(s) is essential. Currently, ultrasonography combined with [Tc-99m]Tc-MIBI parathyroid scintigraphy, optionally associated with single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT), represent the standard preoperative imaging. In recent years, a number of studies have evaluated the potential role of choline positron emission tomography (PET) in hyperparathyroidism with promising results. Most of the recent evidence underlined its higher sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy in the localization of hyperfunctioning parathyroid glands. Choline PET has a higher spatial resolution that is useful for the detection of smaller parathyroid glands and it also has shorter examination times and favorable radiation exposure. These are just a few of the aspects that support it to overcome traditional imaging. Moreover, from the preliminary data, the choline uptake mechanism seems to also have an impact on its better performance. For these reasons, if first used as second level imaging in patients with negative or inconclusive traditional imaging results, several authors have supported its use as a first line investigation. This comprehensive overview aims to provide an accurate description of the preliminary results available in the literature about the use of choline PET/CT in hyperparathyroidism and to compare these results with the performance of traditional imaging methods.

Diagnostic Value of Choline PET in the Preoperative Localization of Hyperfunctioning Parathyroid Gland(s): A Comprehensive Overview

Ferrari, Cristina;Santo, Giulia;Mammucci, Paolo;Pisani, Antonio Rosario;Sardaro, Angela
Investigation
;
Rubini, Giuseppe
2021-01-01

Abstract

Hyperparathyroidism is a metabolic disorder characterized by the excessive production of the parathyroid hormone. The diagnosis is based on clinical and laboratory data. In most cases the only treatment is surgery and a correct preoperatory localization of the hyperfunctioning parathyroid gland(s) is essential. Currently, ultrasonography combined with [Tc-99m]Tc-MIBI parathyroid scintigraphy, optionally associated with single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT), represent the standard preoperative imaging. In recent years, a number of studies have evaluated the potential role of choline positron emission tomography (PET) in hyperparathyroidism with promising results. Most of the recent evidence underlined its higher sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy in the localization of hyperfunctioning parathyroid glands. Choline PET has a higher spatial resolution that is useful for the detection of smaller parathyroid glands and it also has shorter examination times and favorable radiation exposure. These are just a few of the aspects that support it to overcome traditional imaging. Moreover, from the preliminary data, the choline uptake mechanism seems to also have an impact on its better performance. For these reasons, if first used as second level imaging in patients with negative or inconclusive traditional imaging results, several authors have supported its use as a first line investigation. This comprehensive overview aims to provide an accurate description of the preliminary results available in the literature about the use of choline PET/CT in hyperparathyroidism and to compare these results with the performance of traditional imaging methods.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11586/371573
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