BACKGROUND: The ISTH Bleeding Assessment Tool (ISTH-BAT) has been validated for clinical screening of suspected von Willebrand disease (VWD) and for bleeding prediction. Recently it has been validated for subjects with inherited platelet disorders (IPD) (BAT-VAL study). OBJECTIVES: To determine whether the ISTH-BAT bleeding score (BS) predicts subsequent bleeding events requiring treatment in IPD patients. METHODS: Patients with IPD, type 1 VWD (VWD-1) and age- and sex-matched healthy controls enrolled in the BAT-VAL study were prospectively followed-up for 2 years and bleeding episodes requiring treatment were recorded. RESULTS: Of the 1098 subjects initially enrolled, 955 were followed-up and 124 suffered hemorrhages during follow-up, 60% of whom had inherited platelet function disorders (IPFD). Total number of events was significantly higher in IPFD (n = 235) than VWD-1 (n = 52) or inherited thrombocytopenia (IT; n = 20). Events requiring transfusions were 66% in IPFD, 5.7% in VWD-1, and 3% in IT. Baseline BS was significantly higher in IPFD patients with a bleeding event at follow-up than in those without (p < .01) and the percentage of subjects suffering a bleeding event increased proportionally to baseline BS quartile. A significant association between the BS and the chance of suffering severe bleeding was found in the overall, IPFD, and VWD-1 populations. Similar results were obtained for the pediatric population. CONCLUSIONS: Inherited platelet function disorder patients with high BS at enrollment are more likely to suffer from bleeding events requiring treatment at follow-up. Moreover, the higher the baseline BS quartile the greater the incidence of subsequent events, suggesting that independently from diagnosis a high BS is associated with a greater risk of subsequent hemorrhage.

The ISTH bleeding assessment tool as predictor of bleeding events in inherited platelet disorders: Communication from the ISTH SSC Subcommittee on Platelet Physiology

Guglielmini G.;
2021-01-01

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The ISTH Bleeding Assessment Tool (ISTH-BAT) has been validated for clinical screening of suspected von Willebrand disease (VWD) and for bleeding prediction. Recently it has been validated for subjects with inherited platelet disorders (IPD) (BAT-VAL study). OBJECTIVES: To determine whether the ISTH-BAT bleeding score (BS) predicts subsequent bleeding events requiring treatment in IPD patients. METHODS: Patients with IPD, type 1 VWD (VWD-1) and age- and sex-matched healthy controls enrolled in the BAT-VAL study were prospectively followed-up for 2 years and bleeding episodes requiring treatment were recorded. RESULTS: Of the 1098 subjects initially enrolled, 955 were followed-up and 124 suffered hemorrhages during follow-up, 60% of whom had inherited platelet function disorders (IPFD). Total number of events was significantly higher in IPFD (n = 235) than VWD-1 (n = 52) or inherited thrombocytopenia (IT; n = 20). Events requiring transfusions were 66% in IPFD, 5.7% in VWD-1, and 3% in IT. Baseline BS was significantly higher in IPFD patients with a bleeding event at follow-up than in those without (p < .01) and the percentage of subjects suffering a bleeding event increased proportionally to baseline BS quartile. A significant association between the BS and the chance of suffering severe bleeding was found in the overall, IPFD, and VWD-1 populations. Similar results were obtained for the pediatric population. CONCLUSIONS: Inherited platelet function disorder patients with high BS at enrollment are more likely to suffer from bleeding events requiring treatment at follow-up. Moreover, the higher the baseline BS quartile the greater the incidence of subsequent events, suggesting that independently from diagnosis a high BS is associated with a greater risk of subsequent hemorrhage.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11586/371091
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