Aim and objectives: To assess the prevalence of anxiety, sleep disorders and self-efficacy and their predicting factors among nurses facing COVID-19. Background: The spread of COVID-19 throughout the world determined a series of modifications of several National Health Service organizations, with a potential series of psychological consequences among nurses, who were particularly afflicted by this situation of changes and precariousness. Design: A cross-sectional study was carried out from February to April 2020, METHODS: 1,005 nurses employed in different Italian hospital wards, during the COVID-19 pandemic, were recruited. Analyses were based on descriptive statistics and multivariate logistic regression. The STROBE checklist for cross-sectional studies was used in this study. Results: The prevalence of sleep disturbances, moderate anxiety and low self-efficacy was 71.4%, 33.23% and 50.65%, respectively. We found a positive correlation between anxiety and sleep quality (0.408; p < 0.0001) and negative correlations between self-efficacy and anxiety (-0.217; p < 0.0001) and sleep quality and self-efficacy (-0.134; p < 0.0001). The factor independently associated with all variables was gender. Females were more prone to sleep disturbances, anxiety and low levels of self-efficacy than males (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The prevalence of anxiety, sleep disorders and low self-efficacy among Italian nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic was high. Healthcare managers should recognize and consider these results to reduce the risk of the onset of major mental problems that could result in post-traumatic stress disorder. Relevance to clinical practice: Nurses facing major incidents, as COVID-19 pandemic are among healthcare personnel exposed to a high risk to develop psychological disturbance that should be assessed and recognized, in order to find helpful coping strategies to inform support services and avoid to hesitate in post-traumatic stress disorders.

Anxiety, sleep disorders and self-efficacy among nurses during COVID-19 pandemic: A cross-sectional study

Graziano G;Cicolini G.
2021-01-01

Abstract

Aim and objectives: To assess the prevalence of anxiety, sleep disorders and self-efficacy and their predicting factors among nurses facing COVID-19. Background: The spread of COVID-19 throughout the world determined a series of modifications of several National Health Service organizations, with a potential series of psychological consequences among nurses, who were particularly afflicted by this situation of changes and precariousness. Design: A cross-sectional study was carried out from February to April 2020, METHODS: 1,005 nurses employed in different Italian hospital wards, during the COVID-19 pandemic, were recruited. Analyses were based on descriptive statistics and multivariate logistic regression. The STROBE checklist for cross-sectional studies was used in this study. Results: The prevalence of sleep disturbances, moderate anxiety and low self-efficacy was 71.4%, 33.23% and 50.65%, respectively. We found a positive correlation between anxiety and sleep quality (0.408; p < 0.0001) and negative correlations between self-efficacy and anxiety (-0.217; p < 0.0001) and sleep quality and self-efficacy (-0.134; p < 0.0001). The factor independently associated with all variables was gender. Females were more prone to sleep disturbances, anxiety and low levels of self-efficacy than males (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The prevalence of anxiety, sleep disorders and low self-efficacy among Italian nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic was high. Healthcare managers should recognize and consider these results to reduce the risk of the onset of major mental problems that could result in post-traumatic stress disorder. Relevance to clinical practice: Nurses facing major incidents, as COVID-19 pandemic are among healthcare personnel exposed to a high risk to develop psychological disturbance that should be assessed and recognized, in order to find helpful coping strategies to inform support services and avoid to hesitate in post-traumatic stress disorders.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11586/358636
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