During cultivation under nitrogen starvation, Yarrowia lipolytica produces a mixture of citric acid and isocitric acid whose ratio is mainly determined by the carbon source used. We report that mitochondrial succinate–fumarate carrier YlSfc1 controls isocitric acid efflux from mitochondria. YlSfc1 purified and reconstituted into liposomes transports succinate, fumarate, oxaloacetate, isocitrate and α-ketoglutarate. YlSFC1 overexpression determined the inversion of isocitric acid/citric acid ratio towards isocitric acid, resulting in 33.4 ± 1.9 g/L and 43.3 ± 2.8 g/L of ICA production in test-tube cultivation with glucose and glycerol, respectively. These titers represent a 4.0 and 6.3-fold increase compared to the wild type. YlSFC1 gene expression was repressed in the wild type strain grown in glucose-based medium compared to olive oil medium explaining the reason for the preferred citric acid production during Y. lipolytica growth on carbohydrates. Coexpression of YlSFC1 and adenosine monophosphate deaminase YlAMPD genes together with inactivation of citrate mitochondrial carrier YlYHM2 gene enhanced isocitric acid accumulation up to 41.4 ± 4.1 g/L with an isocitric acid/citric acid ratio of 14.3 in a small-scale cultivation with glucose as a carbon source. During large-scale cultivation with glucose pulse-feeding, the engineered strain produced 136.7 ± 2.5 g/L of ICA with a process selectivity of 88.1%, the highest reported titer and selectivity to date. These results represent the first reported isocitric acid secretion by Y. lipolytica as a main organic acid during cultivation on carbohydrate. Moreover, we demonstrate for the first time that the replacement of one mitochondrial transport system for another can be an efficient tool for switching product accumulation.

Engineering Yarrowia lipolytica for the selective and high-level production of isocitric acid through manipulation of mitochondrial dicarboxylate–tricarboxylate carriers

Scarcia P.;Messina E.;Palmieri L.;Palmieri F.;Agrimi G.
2021-01-01

Abstract

During cultivation under nitrogen starvation, Yarrowia lipolytica produces a mixture of citric acid and isocitric acid whose ratio is mainly determined by the carbon source used. We report that mitochondrial succinate–fumarate carrier YlSfc1 controls isocitric acid efflux from mitochondria. YlSfc1 purified and reconstituted into liposomes transports succinate, fumarate, oxaloacetate, isocitrate and α-ketoglutarate. YlSFC1 overexpression determined the inversion of isocitric acid/citric acid ratio towards isocitric acid, resulting in 33.4 ± 1.9 g/L and 43.3 ± 2.8 g/L of ICA production in test-tube cultivation with glucose and glycerol, respectively. These titers represent a 4.0 and 6.3-fold increase compared to the wild type. YlSFC1 gene expression was repressed in the wild type strain grown in glucose-based medium compared to olive oil medium explaining the reason for the preferred citric acid production during Y. lipolytica growth on carbohydrates. Coexpression of YlSFC1 and adenosine monophosphate deaminase YlAMPD genes together with inactivation of citrate mitochondrial carrier YlYHM2 gene enhanced isocitric acid accumulation up to 41.4 ± 4.1 g/L with an isocitric acid/citric acid ratio of 14.3 in a small-scale cultivation with glucose as a carbon source. During large-scale cultivation with glucose pulse-feeding, the engineered strain produced 136.7 ± 2.5 g/L of ICA with a process selectivity of 88.1%, the highest reported titer and selectivity to date. These results represent the first reported isocitric acid secretion by Y. lipolytica as a main organic acid during cultivation on carbohydrate. Moreover, we demonstrate for the first time that the replacement of one mitochondrial transport system for another can be an efficient tool for switching product accumulation.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11586/349079
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