The lifetime of an unstable atom can be extended by watching it closely, i.e., illuminating it with an intense electromagnetic field of appropriate frequency. This is an example of ''dominated evolution'' and is closely related to the so-called ''quantum Zeno effect.'' For a metastable atom bathed in a laser beam at the frequency of another of its transitions, we obtain an expression for the modified lifetime as a function of beam intensity. This provides an example of the quantum Zeno effect on a truly decaying system, and also should be useful for probing short distance features of atomic wave functions.

Hindered decay: Quantum Zeno effect through electromagnetic field domination / Mihokova E; Pascazio S; Schulman LS. - In: PHYSICAL REVIEW A. - ISSN 1050-2947. - 56:1(1997), pp. 25-32.

Hindered decay: Quantum Zeno effect through electromagnetic field domination

PASCAZIO, Saverio;
1997

Abstract

The lifetime of an unstable atom can be extended by watching it closely, i.e., illuminating it with an intense electromagnetic field of appropriate frequency. This is an example of ''dominated evolution'' and is closely related to the so-called ''quantum Zeno effect.'' For a metastable atom bathed in a laser beam at the frequency of another of its transitions, we obtain an expression for the modified lifetime as a function of beam intensity. This provides an example of the quantum Zeno effect on a truly decaying system, and also should be useful for probing short distance features of atomic wave functions.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11586/31612
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 50
social impact