Background. Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a progressive fatal disease thus, noninvasive prognostic tools are needed to follow these patients. The aim of our study was to evaluate fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) and exhaled breath temperature (EBT) values in patients with PH from different causes and to correlate them with respiratory functional data. Methods. Twenty-four PH patients underwent spirometry, carbon monoxide diffusion (DLCO) test, transthoracic echocardiography, right-heart catheterization, and FeNO and EBT measurements. Results. We studied 3 groups according to the type of PH: 10 patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) (group A), 11 patients with PH due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (group B), and 3 patients with PH associated with left heart disease (group C). Mean FeNO values tend to be higher in group B (15.0 ± 9.3ppb) compared with other groups (respectively, 9.9 ± 5.7 and 8.5 ± 5.2 ppb in groups A and C; p = 0.271) but no statistical significance has been reached. Mean values of alveolar NO concentration (CANO) were higher in groups A and B compared to group C (respectively, 16.9 ± 12.6; 13.9 ± 6.8; and 6.7 ± 2.0 ppb) (p = 0.045). EBT mean values were significantly lower in group C when compared with other groups (group C: 29.0 +- 1.3°C, groups A and B: 30.9 ± 1.3 and 31.2 ± 1.2°C, respectively: p = 0.041). EBT levels were inversely correlated to mean pulmonary artery pressure (PAPm) levels (Spearman coefficient -0.481; p = 0.017). Conclusions. eNO, CANO, and EBT have been evaluated in three groups of PH patients. Interestingly EBT reduction was correlated with PAPm increase, whereas FeNO was higher in COPD patients and CANO in PAH and COPD groups. Further studies are needed to clarify EBT, FeNO, and CANO roles as biomarkers in the monitoring of patients with PH.

Exhaled Nitric Oxide and Exhaled Breath Temperature as Potential Biomarkers in Patients with Pulmonary Hypertension

Carpagnano G. E.;Palmiotti A.;Di Biase M.;Scioscia G.;
2018

Abstract

Background. Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a progressive fatal disease thus, noninvasive prognostic tools are needed to follow these patients. The aim of our study was to evaluate fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) and exhaled breath temperature (EBT) values in patients with PH from different causes and to correlate them with respiratory functional data. Methods. Twenty-four PH patients underwent spirometry, carbon monoxide diffusion (DLCO) test, transthoracic echocardiography, right-heart catheterization, and FeNO and EBT measurements. Results. We studied 3 groups according to the type of PH: 10 patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) (group A), 11 patients with PH due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (group B), and 3 patients with PH associated with left heart disease (group C). Mean FeNO values tend to be higher in group B (15.0 ± 9.3ppb) compared with other groups (respectively, 9.9 ± 5.7 and 8.5 ± 5.2 ppb in groups A and C; p = 0.271) but no statistical significance has been reached. Mean values of alveolar NO concentration (CANO) were higher in groups A and B compared to group C (respectively, 16.9 ± 12.6; 13.9 ± 6.8; and 6.7 ± 2.0 ppb) (p = 0.045). EBT mean values were significantly lower in group C when compared with other groups (group C: 29.0 +- 1.3°C, groups A and B: 30.9 ± 1.3 and 31.2 ± 1.2°C, respectively: p = 0.041). EBT levels were inversely correlated to mean pulmonary artery pressure (PAPm) levels (Spearman coefficient -0.481; p = 0.017). Conclusions. eNO, CANO, and EBT have been evaluated in three groups of PH patients. Interestingly EBT reduction was correlated with PAPm increase, whereas FeNO was higher in COPD patients and CANO in PAH and COPD groups. Further studies are needed to clarify EBT, FeNO, and CANO roles as biomarkers in the monitoring of patients with PH.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11586/296288
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