Background: Identifying predictive factors that contribute to changes in body weight may well be an interesting approach to the management of obesity. Objective: This study was firstly aimed at examining the effect of a one-year lifestyle program based on improvements of the habitual diet and increased levels of physical activity on weight loss. Secondly, it was focused on identifying anthropometric, and serum hormonal, metabolic and haematochemical factors which can be associated with the degree of weight loss in Kg. Methods: 488 overweight or obese subjects, 383 women and 105 men, aged 18-67 years, were enrolled in the study. Body mass index, waist circumference, serum blood glucose, lipids, uric acid, creatinine, insulin, TSH, FT3, FT4, and 24-h urine catecholamines were measured. Results: Weight loss was positively associated with BMI (P < 0.01), waist circumference (P < 0.01), uric acid (P < 0.01), creatinine (P < 0.05), smoking (P < 0.01), and negatively correlated with age (P < 0.01), total cholesterol (P < 0.05), LDL-cholesterol (P < 0.01), HDL cholesterol (P < 0.05). In a multiple regression model considering weight loss as a dependent variable, and smoking, age, BMI, uric acid, creatinine, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and HDL cholesterol as independent variables, weight loss maintained a direct independent relationship with BMI (P < 0.001), uric acid (P < 0.05), LDL-cholesterol (P < 0.05), and HDL-cholesterol (P < 0.05), and an inverse independent association with cholesterol (P < 0.01). Conclusions: This study suggests that higher BMI and uric acid levels, and lower total cholesterol concentrations are associated with a greater potential to lose weight.

Higher Body Mass Index, Uric Acid Levels, and Lower Cholesterol Levels are Associated with Greater Weight Loss

De Pergola, Giovanni;Giannelli, Gianluigi;Triggiani, Vincenzo
2020

Abstract

Background: Identifying predictive factors that contribute to changes in body weight may well be an interesting approach to the management of obesity. Objective: This study was firstly aimed at examining the effect of a one-year lifestyle program based on improvements of the habitual diet and increased levels of physical activity on weight loss. Secondly, it was focused on identifying anthropometric, and serum hormonal, metabolic and haematochemical factors which can be associated with the degree of weight loss in Kg. Methods: 488 overweight or obese subjects, 383 women and 105 men, aged 18-67 years, were enrolled in the study. Body mass index, waist circumference, serum blood glucose, lipids, uric acid, creatinine, insulin, TSH, FT3, FT4, and 24-h urine catecholamines were measured. Results: Weight loss was positively associated with BMI (P < 0.01), waist circumference (P < 0.01), uric acid (P < 0.01), creatinine (P < 0.05), smoking (P < 0.01), and negatively correlated with age (P < 0.01), total cholesterol (P < 0.05), LDL-cholesterol (P < 0.01), HDL cholesterol (P < 0.05). In a multiple regression model considering weight loss as a dependent variable, and smoking, age, BMI, uric acid, creatinine, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and HDL cholesterol as independent variables, weight loss maintained a direct independent relationship with BMI (P < 0.001), uric acid (P < 0.05), LDL-cholesterol (P < 0.05), and HDL-cholesterol (P < 0.05), and an inverse independent association with cholesterol (P < 0.01). Conclusions: This study suggests that higher BMI and uric acid levels, and lower total cholesterol concentrations are associated with a greater potential to lose weight.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11586/282475
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