Introduction and Objectives The animal models for renal carcinogenesis have allowed researchers to better understand the physiopathological, genetic, molecular, and immunological mechanisms underlying the development of human renal cancers from the induction of precancerous lesions to the metastatic process. Our study aimed to review and discuss the characteristics of all the spontaneous animal models of renal carcinogenesis described in scientific literature to date and see how they could address future challenges in the field of personalized medicine. Methods and Materials We reviewed all the papers on PubMed which focus on spontaneous animal models of renal carcinogenesis. To do so, we used the keywords “spontaneous” AND “animal model” AND “renal cancer” in the PubMed search engine. We also conducted a search using the keywords “spontaneous” AND “animal model” AND “kidney cancer.” PRISMA recommendations were used for the literature review. Results A total of 213 publications were found on PubMed with the keywords “spontaneous” AND “animal model” AND “kidney cancer.” 219 publications were found on PubMed with the keywords “spontaneous” AND “animal model” AND “renal cancer.” After pooling these 2 searches and removing the duplicate publications, 233 publications remained. Among these, 220 full-text articles were assessed for eligibility; 160 were removed because they were irrelevant to our topic, and the remaining 60 studies were included in our qualitative synthesis. Conclusions Many spontaneous animal models have been developed to study renal cancer. So far, these models have enabled the understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms underlying renal cancer. Though less appropriate than patient xenografts from the perspective of personalized medicine, we believe animal models can help medical professionals better understand the hows and whys of the genetic events underlying the intratumoral heterogeneity and spatial distribution of metastatic subclones.

Animal models of spontaneous renal carcinoma: A possible rebirth?

Ribatti D.
2020

Abstract

Introduction and Objectives The animal models for renal carcinogenesis have allowed researchers to better understand the physiopathological, genetic, molecular, and immunological mechanisms underlying the development of human renal cancers from the induction of precancerous lesions to the metastatic process. Our study aimed to review and discuss the characteristics of all the spontaneous animal models of renal carcinogenesis described in scientific literature to date and see how they could address future challenges in the field of personalized medicine. Methods and Materials We reviewed all the papers on PubMed which focus on spontaneous animal models of renal carcinogenesis. To do so, we used the keywords “spontaneous” AND “animal model” AND “renal cancer” in the PubMed search engine. We also conducted a search using the keywords “spontaneous” AND “animal model” AND “kidney cancer.” PRISMA recommendations were used for the literature review. Results A total of 213 publications were found on PubMed with the keywords “spontaneous” AND “animal model” AND “kidney cancer.” 219 publications were found on PubMed with the keywords “spontaneous” AND “animal model” AND “renal cancer.” After pooling these 2 searches and removing the duplicate publications, 233 publications remained. Among these, 220 full-text articles were assessed for eligibility; 160 were removed because they were irrelevant to our topic, and the remaining 60 studies were included in our qualitative synthesis. Conclusions Many spontaneous animal models have been developed to study renal cancer. So far, these models have enabled the understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms underlying renal cancer. Though less appropriate than patient xenografts from the perspective of personalized medicine, we believe animal models can help medical professionals better understand the hows and whys of the genetic events underlying the intratumoral heterogeneity and spatial distribution of metastatic subclones.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11586/281966
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