Curcumin diffuses through cell membranes into the endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, and nucleus, where it exerts actions, as an antioxidant property. Therefore, its use has been advocated for chemopreventive, antimetastatic, and anti-angiogenic purposes. We conducted a literature review to summarize studies investigating the relationship between curcumin and colorectal cancer (CRC). In vitro studies, performed on human colon cancer cell lines, showed that curcumin inhibited cellular growth through cycle arrest at the G2/M and G1 phases, as well as stimulated apoptosis by interacting with multiple molecular targets. In vivo studies have been performed in inflammatory and genetic CRC animal models with a chemopreventive effect. To improve curcumin bioavailability, it has been associated with small particles that increase its absorption when orally administered with excellent results on both inflammation and carcinogenesis. Curcumin has been used, moreover, as a component of dietetic formulations for CRC chemoprevention. These combinations showed in vitro and in vivo anticarcinogenetic properties in inflammation-related and genetic CRC. A synergic effect was suggested using an individual constituent dosage, which was lower than that experimentally used “in vivo” for single components. In conclusion, curcumin falls within the category of plant origin substances able to prevent CRC in animals. This property offers promising expectations in humans.

Curcumin and colorectal cancer: From basic to clinical evidences

Pricci M.;Girardi B.;Losurdo G.;Di Leo A.
2020

Abstract

Curcumin diffuses through cell membranes into the endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, and nucleus, where it exerts actions, as an antioxidant property. Therefore, its use has been advocated for chemopreventive, antimetastatic, and anti-angiogenic purposes. We conducted a literature review to summarize studies investigating the relationship between curcumin and colorectal cancer (CRC). In vitro studies, performed on human colon cancer cell lines, showed that curcumin inhibited cellular growth through cycle arrest at the G2/M and G1 phases, as well as stimulated apoptosis by interacting with multiple molecular targets. In vivo studies have been performed in inflammatory and genetic CRC animal models with a chemopreventive effect. To improve curcumin bioavailability, it has been associated with small particles that increase its absorption when orally administered with excellent results on both inflammation and carcinogenesis. Curcumin has been used, moreover, as a component of dietetic formulations for CRC chemoprevention. These combinations showed in vitro and in vivo anticarcinogenetic properties in inflammation-related and genetic CRC. A synergic effect was suggested using an individual constituent dosage, which was lower than that experimentally used “in vivo” for single components. In conclusion, curcumin falls within the category of plant origin substances able to prevent CRC in animals. This property offers promising expectations in humans.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11586/281271
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