Early nutrition and growth are key contributors to the modulation of both short and long-term infant health outcomes [5]. Preterm infants have di↵erent nutritional needs to their term peers in terms of energy, macronutrients and micronutrients intake [6]. Besides, they frequently develop significant postnatal growth retardation [7] with altered body composition [8,9]. Preterm infants develop a relative reduction in fat free mass with increased adiposity, which, respectively, may contribute to adverse neuro and metabolic outcomes [8–11]. Accordingly, both the prevention and recovery of any nutritional deficits accounting for growth pattern and body composition alterations should be a priority for the nutritional care of infants born preterm. The introduction of solid foods (thereafter referred to as weaning) is associated with major changes in both macronutrients and micronutrients intake, with the risk of nutritional deficits or excesses for infants undergoing a rapid growth and development during this period of life [12]. Yet, surprisingly, relatively little attention has been paid to defining both the ideal age and the detailed content of weaning and to their future possible e↵ects on later health and development [13].

Complementary Feeding in Preterm Infants: Where Do We Stand?

Baldassarre, Maria Elisabetta
Conceptualization
;
Di Mauro, Antonio
Writing – Review & Editing
;
Laforgia, Nicola
Supervision
2020

Abstract

Early nutrition and growth are key contributors to the modulation of both short and long-term infant health outcomes [5]. Preterm infants have di↵erent nutritional needs to their term peers in terms of energy, macronutrients and micronutrients intake [6]. Besides, they frequently develop significant postnatal growth retardation [7] with altered body composition [8,9]. Preterm infants develop a relative reduction in fat free mass with increased adiposity, which, respectively, may contribute to adverse neuro and metabolic outcomes [8–11]. Accordingly, both the prevention and recovery of any nutritional deficits accounting for growth pattern and body composition alterations should be a priority for the nutritional care of infants born preterm. The introduction of solid foods (thereafter referred to as weaning) is associated with major changes in both macronutrients and micronutrients intake, with the risk of nutritional deficits or excesses for infants undergoing a rapid growth and development during this period of life [12]. Yet, surprisingly, relatively little attention has been paid to defining both the ideal age and the detailed content of weaning and to their future possible e↵ects on later health and development [13].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11586/279060
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