Background: Homocysteine is a sulfur amino acid whose metabolism is activated in two pathways: remethylation to methionine, which requires folate and vitamin B12, and transsulfuration to cystathionine, which needs pyridoxal-5’-phosphate. High homocysteine level increases the risk of developing heart disease, stroke, peripheral vascular diseases, and cognitive impairment. Some evidence showed that exposure to these metals increased plasma homocysteine levels. Methods: A systematic review was carried out to clarify the relationship between homocysteine blood levels and exposure to toxic heavy metals (Lead, Cadmium, Mercury, and Chromium). Results: The results of this systematic review indicate that exposure to Pb, Cr, Cd, and Hg is connected with nonphysiological homocysteine levels or vitamin B12 and folate serum concentrations. Conclusions: These findings reinforce the importance of involvement in exposure to heavy metals in homocysteine metabolism. This supports the role of blood metals as potential upstream modifiable risk factors to prevent the development of other established risk factors as hyperhomocysteinemia.

Exposure to toxic heavy metals can influence homocysteine metabolism?

Lovreglio P.;Stufano A.;
2020

Abstract

Background: Homocysteine is a sulfur amino acid whose metabolism is activated in two pathways: remethylation to methionine, which requires folate and vitamin B12, and transsulfuration to cystathionine, which needs pyridoxal-5’-phosphate. High homocysteine level increases the risk of developing heart disease, stroke, peripheral vascular diseases, and cognitive impairment. Some evidence showed that exposure to these metals increased plasma homocysteine levels. Methods: A systematic review was carried out to clarify the relationship between homocysteine blood levels and exposure to toxic heavy metals (Lead, Cadmium, Mercury, and Chromium). Results: The results of this systematic review indicate that exposure to Pb, Cr, Cd, and Hg is connected with nonphysiological homocysteine levels or vitamin B12 and folate serum concentrations. Conclusions: These findings reinforce the importance of involvement in exposure to heavy metals in homocysteine metabolism. This supports the role of blood metals as potential upstream modifiable risk factors to prevent the development of other established risk factors as hyperhomocysteinemia.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11586/262379
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