Applied Nursing Research Available online 1 December 2015 In Press, Accepted Manuscript — Note to users Cover image Self-reported medication adherence and beliefs among elderly in multi-treatment: a cross-sectional study ☆ ☆☆ ★ ★★ ☆☆☆ Giancarlo Cicolini, MSN, PhDa, b, , Dania Comparcini, RN, MSN, PhDa, c, , Maria Elena Flacco, MDa, Lorenzo Capasso, MD, PhDa, Carlo Masucci, RN, MSNd, , Valentina Simonetti, RN, MSN, PhDa, c, , Show more doi:10.1016/j.apnr.2015.11.011 Get rights and content Abstract Aim To evaluate the association between adherence to treatment and beliefs about medications in multi-treated elderly patients. Background A large body of evidence documented the importance of adherence to therapy in predicting clinical outcomes, and the association between adherence and medication beliefs in patients of various ages and with different health conditions. However, so far only a few studies have specifically investigated the associations between medication beliefs and adherence among elderly in polypharmacy. Methods In this multicentre cross-sectional study we used the MMAS-8 and BMQ Scales to assess medication adherence and beliefs about medications, respectively. Results The final sample consisted of 567 patients. Patients reporting higher levels of necessity or concerns about their medicines showed higher adherence (OR: 1.61, and 2.02, respectively; both p<0.001). Accepting patients (high necessity and low concerns) were less likely (OR: 0.24; p<0.001) to report adherence than ambivalent ones (high necessity and concerns). Conclusions Medication adherence is related to high Necessity and Concern about treatment. In nursing practice it is important to understand the specific barriers to adherence and to engage patients in the implementation of strategies to improve adherence.

Self-reported medication adherence and beliefs among elderly in multi-treatment: a cross-sectional study

Cicolini G;
2016

Abstract

Applied Nursing Research Available online 1 December 2015 In Press, Accepted Manuscript — Note to users Cover image Self-reported medication adherence and beliefs among elderly in multi-treatment: a cross-sectional study ☆ ☆☆ ★ ★★ ☆☆☆ Giancarlo Cicolini, MSN, PhDa, b, , Dania Comparcini, RN, MSN, PhDa, c, , Maria Elena Flacco, MDa, Lorenzo Capasso, MD, PhDa, Carlo Masucci, RN, MSNd, , Valentina Simonetti, RN, MSN, PhDa, c, , Show more doi:10.1016/j.apnr.2015.11.011 Get rights and content Abstract Aim To evaluate the association between adherence to treatment and beliefs about medications in multi-treated elderly patients. Background A large body of evidence documented the importance of adherence to therapy in predicting clinical outcomes, and the association between adherence and medication beliefs in patients of various ages and with different health conditions. However, so far only a few studies have specifically investigated the associations between medication beliefs and adherence among elderly in polypharmacy. Methods In this multicentre cross-sectional study we used the MMAS-8 and BMQ Scales to assess medication adherence and beliefs about medications, respectively. Results The final sample consisted of 567 patients. Patients reporting higher levels of necessity or concerns about their medicines showed higher adherence (OR: 1.61, and 2.02, respectively; both p<0.001). Accepting patients (high necessity and low concerns) were less likely (OR: 0.24; p<0.001) to report adherence than ambivalent ones (high necessity and concerns). Conclusions Medication adherence is related to high Necessity and Concern about treatment. In nursing practice it is important to understand the specific barriers to adherence and to engage patients in the implementation of strategies to improve adherence.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11586/258336
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