Achieving target glycaemic control is essential in people with diabetes to minimize the risk of long-term complications, and many people with type 2 diabetes will ultimately require basal insulin (BI) therapy to achieve their individualized glycaemic targets. Usually, the first 12 weeks following initiation of BI therapy represents the period when the greatest dose increases and glycaemic reductions occur. Effective glycaemic control combined with minimizing the risk of hypoglycaemia is important to enable the achievement of glycaemic control in the longer term. However, substantial therapeutic inertia exists in clinical practice, both in initiation and up-titration of BI, owing to patient-, physician- and healthcare system-related barriers, including fear of hypoglycaemia and the perception of a burdensome regimen. The more prolonged duration of action, reduced glycaemic variability and lower risk of hypoglycaemia seen with second-generation versus first-generation BI analogues may help alleviate patients’ and physicians’ concerns and facilitate titration. In turn, optimal BI titration and subsequent metabolic benefits may help improve therapy adherence and self-management. This review details the clinical implications of prompt titration of BI to achieve early glycaemic control, and the importance of minimizing hypoglycaemia risk within the initial titration period. Facilitation of patients’ self-management of BI is also addressed.

The importance of the initial period of basal insulin titration in people with diabetes

Giorgino F.;Berard L.;
In corso di stampa

Abstract

Achieving target glycaemic control is essential in people with diabetes to minimize the risk of long-term complications, and many people with type 2 diabetes will ultimately require basal insulin (BI) therapy to achieve their individualized glycaemic targets. Usually, the first 12 weeks following initiation of BI therapy represents the period when the greatest dose increases and glycaemic reductions occur. Effective glycaemic control combined with minimizing the risk of hypoglycaemia is important to enable the achievement of glycaemic control in the longer term. However, substantial therapeutic inertia exists in clinical practice, both in initiation and up-titration of BI, owing to patient-, physician- and healthcare system-related barriers, including fear of hypoglycaemia and the perception of a burdensome regimen. The more prolonged duration of action, reduced glycaemic variability and lower risk of hypoglycaemia seen with second-generation versus first-generation BI analogues may help alleviate patients’ and physicians’ concerns and facilitate titration. In turn, optimal BI titration and subsequent metabolic benefits may help improve therapy adherence and self-management. This review details the clinical implications of prompt titration of BI to achieve early glycaemic control, and the importance of minimizing hypoglycaemia risk within the initial titration period. Facilitation of patients’ self-management of BI is also addressed.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11586/257083
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