Background: The relationship between atopic dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis is frequently debated, particularly in children. The impaired skin barrier of atopic subjects can facilitate the penetration of exogenous agents and its mutations in the filaggrin gene might be implicated in an increased risk to develop contact dermatitis. Moreover, atopic children arc protractedly exposed to chemical substances contained in skin care products from an early age.Patients And Methods: The aim of this retrospective study is to determine if atopic children are more prone to allergic contact dermatitis and which substances are more frequently related to this disease. From 2014 to 2016, a total of 268 children under 14 years with a history of eczematous dermatitis, of whom 141 (52.6%) were affected, and 127 (47.4%) were not affected by AD, underwent patch testing with the baseline S.I.D.A.P.A standard series.Results: Based on the results of our study, the prevalence of contact allergy in atopic children is comparable to that noted in non-atopic children. The most frequent causes of contact allergy in children are fragrances, and their prevalence is significantly higher in atopic children (19.9%) than in non-atopic ones, (11.8%; p < .05).Conclusion: Our study highlights the importance of patch testing in atopic children for continuously monitoring the trends and changes of contact allergies that are a common disease and is even significantly increasing for some allergens, as fragrances. We may speculate that the protracted use of skincare products, associated with the impaired skin barrier of atopic children, enhances the risk of sensitization to the ingredients of these products.

Contact allergy in children with atopic dermatitis: A retrospective study

Romita P.
;
Foti C.;Magrone T.
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
Bonamonte D.
2019

Abstract

Background: The relationship between atopic dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis is frequently debated, particularly in children. The impaired skin barrier of atopic subjects can facilitate the penetration of exogenous agents and its mutations in the filaggrin gene might be implicated in an increased risk to develop contact dermatitis. Moreover, atopic children arc protractedly exposed to chemical substances contained in skin care products from an early age.Patients And Methods: The aim of this retrospective study is to determine if atopic children are more prone to allergic contact dermatitis and which substances are more frequently related to this disease. From 2014 to 2016, a total of 268 children under 14 years with a history of eczematous dermatitis, of whom 141 (52.6%) were affected, and 127 (47.4%) were not affected by AD, underwent patch testing with the baseline S.I.D.A.P.A standard series.Results: Based on the results of our study, the prevalence of contact allergy in atopic children is comparable to that noted in non-atopic children. The most frequent causes of contact allergy in children are fragrances, and their prevalence is significantly higher in atopic children (19.9%) than in non-atopic ones, (11.8%; p < .05).Conclusion: Our study highlights the importance of patch testing in atopic children for continuously monitoring the trends and changes of contact allergies that are a common disease and is even significantly increasing for some allergens, as fragrances. We may speculate that the protracted use of skincare products, associated with the impaired skin barrier of atopic children, enhances the risk of sensitization to the ingredients of these products.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11586/247080
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