Background: Inconsistent results are reported so far in the literature on the relationship between subjective memory complaints (SMC) and objective memory performance. Mixed findings triggered the need to investigate whether other potential mediating variables, such as mood and non-memory domains, affect the relationship between SMC and memory performance. Aims: The present study aimed to contribute in clarifying the relation between subjective and objective memory considering the potential role of mood and visuospatial/executive functions. Methods: Six hundred and sixty Italian community-dwelling adults (52–91 years old) were enrolled. Italian version of Montreal Cognitive Assessment Test (MoCA), Geriatric Depression Scale and Subjective Memory Complaints Questionnaire (SMCQ) were administered. Four subsamples were composed according to the following criteria: (a) participants with high visuospatial/executive function (VSE) score at MoCA and high mood; (b) participants with high VSE score and low mood; (c) participants with low VSE score and high mood and; (d) participants with low VSE score and low mood. Results: Preliminarily, two confirmatory factor analysis have set the one-factor structure of SMCQ as the best fitting model. Diagnostic accuracy of the SMCQ in discriminating high and low memory score was assessed. ROC analyses confirmed that a low score in executive tasks was associated with poor reliability of the SMCQ. On the contrary, well-preserved executive functions and high mood levels ensured a good reliability of SMCQ in detecting memory problems. Discussion and conclusions: Although mood is a key mediator in the relationship between subjective and objective memory, preserving executive functions is essential for ensuring the accuracy of memory self-appraisal in adulthood and elderly

Visuospatial/executive abilities and mood affect the reliability of a subjective memory complaints measure

Giuseppina Spano
;
Alessandro Oronzo Caffò;Tiziana Lanciano;Antonietta Curci;Andrea Bosco
2020

Abstract

Background: Inconsistent results are reported so far in the literature on the relationship between subjective memory complaints (SMC) and objective memory performance. Mixed findings triggered the need to investigate whether other potential mediating variables, such as mood and non-memory domains, affect the relationship between SMC and memory performance. Aims: The present study aimed to contribute in clarifying the relation between subjective and objective memory considering the potential role of mood and visuospatial/executive functions. Methods: Six hundred and sixty Italian community-dwelling adults (52–91 years old) were enrolled. Italian version of Montreal Cognitive Assessment Test (MoCA), Geriatric Depression Scale and Subjective Memory Complaints Questionnaire (SMCQ) were administered. Four subsamples were composed according to the following criteria: (a) participants with high visuospatial/executive function (VSE) score at MoCA and high mood; (b) participants with high VSE score and low mood; (c) participants with low VSE score and high mood and; (d) participants with low VSE score and low mood. Results: Preliminarily, two confirmatory factor analysis have set the one-factor structure of SMCQ as the best fitting model. Diagnostic accuracy of the SMCQ in discriminating high and low memory score was assessed. ROC analyses confirmed that a low score in executive tasks was associated with poor reliability of the SMCQ. On the contrary, well-preserved executive functions and high mood levels ensured a good reliability of SMCQ in detecting memory problems. Discussion and conclusions: Although mood is a key mediator in the relationship between subjective and objective memory, preserving executive functions is essential for ensuring the accuracy of memory self-appraisal in adulthood and elderly
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11586/244743
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