Bullying is characterized by power imbalances in relationships, which can lead to negative social consequences. Youth with higher levels of resilience and self-efficacy are less likely to engage in aggressive behaviours or be victims of bullying. Karate, a martial art emphasizing respect, self-regulation and health promotion, may be an effective alternative to the anti-bullying failing approach of institutions. Therefore, the purpose of this randomized controlled study was to examine the effect of a 12-week karate-based intervention on resilience and self-efficacy. 100 students from 3 high schools, aged 14-16 years, were randomly assigned to experimental group (n=50) that performed technical Shotokan karate practice and psychoeducational activities (90 min., once per week), or wait-list control group (n=50). Before and after intervention, two standardised psychometric instruments were used: CYRM-28 assessed individual capacities and resources, relationship with primary caregiver, contextual factors and total resilience; SEQ-C measured academic, social, emotional and total self-efficacy. Two participants from karate group withdrew during intervention. A significant ‘Time x Group’ interaction was detected for all dependent measures (p<0.05) with moderate to large effect size. Significant increases from baseline were found for all scores on the resilience and self-efficacy scales (p <0.05). The results suggest that psychosocial intervention based on Karate may improve the resilience and self-efficacy of youth and make them less likely to engage in aggressive behaviour or be bullied. Thus, Karate should be considered an effective alternative to the anti-bullying failing approach of the institutions.

Karate as anti-bullying strategy by improvement resilience and self-efficacy in school-age youth

GRECO G.;CATALDI S.;FISCHETTI F
2019

Abstract

Bullying is characterized by power imbalances in relationships, which can lead to negative social consequences. Youth with higher levels of resilience and self-efficacy are less likely to engage in aggressive behaviours or be victims of bullying. Karate, a martial art emphasizing respect, self-regulation and health promotion, may be an effective alternative to the anti-bullying failing approach of institutions. Therefore, the purpose of this randomized controlled study was to examine the effect of a 12-week karate-based intervention on resilience and self-efficacy. 100 students from 3 high schools, aged 14-16 years, were randomly assigned to experimental group (n=50) that performed technical Shotokan karate practice and psychoeducational activities (90 min., once per week), or wait-list control group (n=50). Before and after intervention, two standardised psychometric instruments were used: CYRM-28 assessed individual capacities and resources, relationship with primary caregiver, contextual factors and total resilience; SEQ-C measured academic, social, emotional and total self-efficacy. Two participants from karate group withdrew during intervention. A significant ‘Time x Group’ interaction was detected for all dependent measures (p<0.05) with moderate to large effect size. Significant increases from baseline were found for all scores on the resilience and self-efficacy scales (p <0.05). The results suggest that psychosocial intervention based on Karate may improve the resilience and self-efficacy of youth and make them less likely to engage in aggressive behaviour or be bullied. Thus, Karate should be considered an effective alternative to the anti-bullying failing approach of the institutions.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11586/244738
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