Ductus venosus (DV) closure plays a key role in hepatic circulation adaptation to postnatal metabolic function, and DV patency might develop a congenital portosystemic shunt (CPSS). The noninvasive Color Flow Mapping (CFM) examination, a validated method to diagnose CPSS in adult dogs, is routinely performed to assess DV closure after birth in humans. This study aimed to describe the feasibility of the ultrasonographic evaluation of the DV after birth and to determine its closure time in healthy Great Dane neonates. Patency of DV in serial Color Flow Mapping (CFM) examinations and bodyweight (BW) were recorded on Days 0-3-6-9 in 24 neonates that were classified as having patent (PDV) or closed ductusvenosus (CDV) basing on CFM signal presence/absence. Since the 3rd day, DV diameter was recorded. Data were analysed by ANOVA (p < 0.05). All dogs resulted healthy 1 year later. The number of PDV and CDV puppies at birth was not different on Day 3 (24 and 0 vs. 22 and 2, PDV and CDV, respectively), whereas it resulted different on Days 6 (24 and 0 vs. 14 and 10) and 9 (24 and 0 vs. 0 and 24); on Day 3, it was different compared to Days 6 and 9; on Day 6, it was different from Day 9. Reduction of DV diameter resulted positively related to neonatal BW growth. The CFM evaluation of DV closure after birth in Great Dane puppies represents a feasible technique. Present results suggest the time of functional closure in normal neonates within 9 days after birth. Thus, CFM examination, as an early screening test for DV patency evaluation, performed 10 days after birth, may identify suspicious dogs at risk that would require further investigations. Further studies are needed to deepen the role of a delayed closure in low bodyweight and preterm puppies.

Colour Flow Mapping examination: An useful screening test for the early diagnosis of ductus venosus patency in canine newborns

Aiudi G.;Lacalandra G. M.;
2018

Abstract

Ductus venosus (DV) closure plays a key role in hepatic circulation adaptation to postnatal metabolic function, and DV patency might develop a congenital portosystemic shunt (CPSS). The noninvasive Color Flow Mapping (CFM) examination, a validated method to diagnose CPSS in adult dogs, is routinely performed to assess DV closure after birth in humans. This study aimed to describe the feasibility of the ultrasonographic evaluation of the DV after birth and to determine its closure time in healthy Great Dane neonates. Patency of DV in serial Color Flow Mapping (CFM) examinations and bodyweight (BW) were recorded on Days 0-3-6-9 in 24 neonates that were classified as having patent (PDV) or closed ductusvenosus (CDV) basing on CFM signal presence/absence. Since the 3rd day, DV diameter was recorded. Data were analysed by ANOVA (p < 0.05). All dogs resulted healthy 1 year later. The number of PDV and CDV puppies at birth was not different on Day 3 (24 and 0 vs. 22 and 2, PDV and CDV, respectively), whereas it resulted different on Days 6 (24 and 0 vs. 14 and 10) and 9 (24 and 0 vs. 0 and 24); on Day 3, it was different compared to Days 6 and 9; on Day 6, it was different from Day 9. Reduction of DV diameter resulted positively related to neonatal BW growth. The CFM evaluation of DV closure after birth in Great Dane puppies represents a feasible technique. Present results suggest the time of functional closure in normal neonates within 9 days after birth. Thus, CFM examination, as an early screening test for DV patency evaluation, performed 10 days after birth, may identify suspicious dogs at risk that would require further investigations. Further studies are needed to deepen the role of a delayed closure in low bodyweight and preterm puppies.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11586/236902
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