Background: The purpose of this study was to analyze the results of infrainguinal revascularization for disabling intermittent claudication (IC) due to femoropopliteal occlusive disease using bypass graft (BPG) surgery with a heparin-bonded expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (HB-ePTFE) graft. Methods: Between 2002 and 2016, we performed 1400 BPGs with HB-ePTFE interventions in patients with femoropopliteal occlusive disease, of which IC was an indication in 485 (34.6%) patients. Early major end points were in-hospital mortality and major complications; late major end points were primary patency, freedom from redo bypass, freedom from progression to critical limb ischemia, and freedom from above-knee amputation or prosthetic graft infection. Results: We performed 200 (41.2%) above-knee BPGs and 231 (47.6%) below-knee BPGs; 54 (11.1%) BPGs targeted a tibial artery. In-hospital death occurred in two (0.4%) patients. Overall, the major complication rate was 4.3%. The median duration of follow-up was 33 months (range, 1-150 months; interquartile range [IQR], 14-62.8 months); the cumulative follow-up index for survival was 0.75 ± 0.25. During the follow-up, 56 (11.6%) patients died. Estimated primary patency of the BPG was 86.1% ± 1.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 82.7-88.9) at 12 months, 68.4% ± 2.4% (95% CI, 63.5-72.9) at 36 months, and 57.7% ± 2.9% (95% CI, 52.0-63.2) at 60 months. On multivariate analysis, runoff status (no or one vessel), site of the distal anastomosis (below the knee), and postoperative medical treatment (oral anticoagulants) impaired primary patency. Estimated freedom from redo bypass was 96.1% ± 0.9% (95% CI, 93.9-97.5) at 12 months, 84.8% ± 1.9% (95% CI, 80.7-88.2) at 36 months, and 76.4% ± 2.6% (95% CI, 71.0-81.1) at 60 months. Both the runoff status (no or one vessel) and the diameter of the graft (6 mm) were significantly associated with the need for redo bypass. Freedom from progression to critical limb ischemia was 86.1% ± 2.2% (95% CI, 81.2-89.9) at 60 months. During the follow-up, there were 20 (4.1%) above-knee amputations, which occurred at a median of 33 months (range, 2-107 months; IQR, 14-63 months) after the indexed BPG intervention. Prosthetic graft infection occurred in seven (1.4%) patients, with a median delay from index procedure to presentation with graft infection of 33 months (range, 1-72 months; IQR, 14-62.5 months), resulting in a freedom from prosthetic graft infection rate of 98.2% ± 2% (95% CI, 95.8-99.2) at 60 months. Conclusions: In patients suffering from lifestyle-disabling IC with long or complex occlusive lesions of the femoropopliteal segment, open BPG surgery with Hb-ePTFE graft had an acceptably low mortality rate. A poor runoff status was a significant predictor of loss of graft patency, especially after a below-knee anastomosis, as was the need for redo bypass. Dual antiplatelet therapy had significantly better results against follow-up thrombosis, and 8-mm grafts showed better freedom from redo bypass compared with 6-mm grafts.

Results of infrainguinal revascularization with bypass surgery using a heparin-bonded graft for disabling intermittent claudication due to femoropopliteal occlusive disease

Pulli R.;
2019

Abstract

Background: The purpose of this study was to analyze the results of infrainguinal revascularization for disabling intermittent claudication (IC) due to femoropopliteal occlusive disease using bypass graft (BPG) surgery with a heparin-bonded expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (HB-ePTFE) graft. Methods: Between 2002 and 2016, we performed 1400 BPGs with HB-ePTFE interventions in patients with femoropopliteal occlusive disease, of which IC was an indication in 485 (34.6%) patients. Early major end points were in-hospital mortality and major complications; late major end points were primary patency, freedom from redo bypass, freedom from progression to critical limb ischemia, and freedom from above-knee amputation or prosthetic graft infection. Results: We performed 200 (41.2%) above-knee BPGs and 231 (47.6%) below-knee BPGs; 54 (11.1%) BPGs targeted a tibial artery. In-hospital death occurred in two (0.4%) patients. Overall, the major complication rate was 4.3%. The median duration of follow-up was 33 months (range, 1-150 months; interquartile range [IQR], 14-62.8 months); the cumulative follow-up index for survival was 0.75 ± 0.25. During the follow-up, 56 (11.6%) patients died. Estimated primary patency of the BPG was 86.1% ± 1.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 82.7-88.9) at 12 months, 68.4% ± 2.4% (95% CI, 63.5-72.9) at 36 months, and 57.7% ± 2.9% (95% CI, 52.0-63.2) at 60 months. On multivariate analysis, runoff status (no or one vessel), site of the distal anastomosis (below the knee), and postoperative medical treatment (oral anticoagulants) impaired primary patency. Estimated freedom from redo bypass was 96.1% ± 0.9% (95% CI, 93.9-97.5) at 12 months, 84.8% ± 1.9% (95% CI, 80.7-88.2) at 36 months, and 76.4% ± 2.6% (95% CI, 71.0-81.1) at 60 months. Both the runoff status (no or one vessel) and the diameter of the graft (6 mm) were significantly associated with the need for redo bypass. Freedom from progression to critical limb ischemia was 86.1% ± 2.2% (95% CI, 81.2-89.9) at 60 months. During the follow-up, there were 20 (4.1%) above-knee amputations, which occurred at a median of 33 months (range, 2-107 months; IQR, 14-63 months) after the indexed BPG intervention. Prosthetic graft infection occurred in seven (1.4%) patients, with a median delay from index procedure to presentation with graft infection of 33 months (range, 1-72 months; IQR, 14-62.5 months), resulting in a freedom from prosthetic graft infection rate of 98.2% ± 2% (95% CI, 95.8-99.2) at 60 months. Conclusions: In patients suffering from lifestyle-disabling IC with long or complex occlusive lesions of the femoropopliteal segment, open BPG surgery with Hb-ePTFE graft had an acceptably low mortality rate. A poor runoff status was a significant predictor of loss of graft patency, especially after a below-knee anastomosis, as was the need for redo bypass. Dual antiplatelet therapy had significantly better results against follow-up thrombosis, and 8-mm grafts showed better freedom from redo bypass compared with 6-mm grafts.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11586/231053
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