Heart rate variability (HRV; variability of the RR interval of the electrocardiogram) results from the activity of several coexisting control mechanisms, which involve the influence of respiration (RESP) and systolic blood pressure (SBP) oscillations operating across multiple temporal scales and changing in different physiological states. In this study, multiscale information decomposition is used to dissect the physiological mechanisms related to the genesis ofHRVin 78 young volunteers monitored at rest and during postural and mental stress evoked by head-up tilt (HUT) and mental arithmetics (MA). After representing RR, RESP and SBP at different time scales through a recently proposed method based on multivariate state space models, the joint information transfer TRESP,SBP→RR is decomposed into unique, redundant and synergistic components, describing the strength of baroreflex modulation independent of respiration (USBP→RR), nonbaroreflex (URESP→RR) and baroreflex-mediated (RRESP,SBP→RR) respiratory influences, and simultaneous presence of baroreflex and nonbaroreflex respiratory influences (SRESP,SBP→RR), respectively. We find that fast (short time scale) HRV oscillations-respiratory sinus arrhythmia-originate from the coexistence of baroreflex and nonbaroreflex (central) mechanisms at rest, with a stronger baroreflex involvement during HUT. Focusing on slower HRV oscillations, the baroreflex origin is dominant and MA leads to its higher involvement. Respiration influences independent on baroreflex are present at long time scales, and are enhanced during HUT.

Multiscale information decomposition dissects control mechanisms of heart rate variability at rest and during physiological stress

Stramaglia S.;
2019

Abstract

Heart rate variability (HRV; variability of the RR interval of the electrocardiogram) results from the activity of several coexisting control mechanisms, which involve the influence of respiration (RESP) and systolic blood pressure (SBP) oscillations operating across multiple temporal scales and changing in different physiological states. In this study, multiscale information decomposition is used to dissect the physiological mechanisms related to the genesis ofHRVin 78 young volunteers monitored at rest and during postural and mental stress evoked by head-up tilt (HUT) and mental arithmetics (MA). After representing RR, RESP and SBP at different time scales through a recently proposed method based on multivariate state space models, the joint information transfer TRESP,SBP→RR is decomposed into unique, redundant and synergistic components, describing the strength of baroreflex modulation independent of respiration (USBP→RR), nonbaroreflex (URESP→RR) and baroreflex-mediated (RRESP,SBP→RR) respiratory influences, and simultaneous presence of baroreflex and nonbaroreflex respiratory influences (SRESP,SBP→RR), respectively. We find that fast (short time scale) HRV oscillations-respiratory sinus arrhythmia-originate from the coexistence of baroreflex and nonbaroreflex (central) mechanisms at rest, with a stronger baroreflex involvement during HUT. Focusing on slower HRV oscillations, the baroreflex origin is dominant and MA leads to its higher involvement. Respiration influences independent on baroreflex are present at long time scales, and are enhanced during HUT.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11586/231049
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