We open the paper with introductory considerations describing the motivations of our long-term research plan targeting gravitomagnetism, illustrating the fluid-dynamics numerical test case selected for that purpose, that is, a perfect-gas sphere contained in a solid shell located in empty space sufficiently away from other masses, and defining the main objective of this study: the determination of the gravitofluid-static field required as initial field (t = 0) in forthcoming fluid-dynamics calculations. The determination of the gravitofluid-static field requires the solution of the isothermal-sphere Lane– Emden equation. We do not follow the habitual approach of the literature based on the prescription of the central density as boundary condition; we impose the gravitational field at the solid-shell internal wall. As the discourse develops, we point out differences and similarities between the literature’s and our approach. We show that the nondimensional formulation of the problem hinges on a unique physical characteristic number that we call gravitational number because it gauges the self-gravity effects on the gas’ fluid statics. We illustrate and discuss numerical results; some peculiarities, such as gravitational-number upper bound and multiple solutions, lead us to investigate the thermodynamics of the physical system, particularly entropy and energy, and preliminarily explore whether or not thermodynamic-stability reasons could provide justification for either selection or exclusion of multiple solutions. We close the paper with a summary of the present study in which we draw conclusions and describe future work.

Fluid statics of a self-gravitating perfect-gas isothermal sphere

P. Amodio;Iavernaro;A. Labianca;M. Lazzo;F. Mazzia;L. Pisani
2019

Abstract

We open the paper with introductory considerations describing the motivations of our long-term research plan targeting gravitomagnetism, illustrating the fluid-dynamics numerical test case selected for that purpose, that is, a perfect-gas sphere contained in a solid shell located in empty space sufficiently away from other masses, and defining the main objective of this study: the determination of the gravitofluid-static field required as initial field (t = 0) in forthcoming fluid-dynamics calculations. The determination of the gravitofluid-static field requires the solution of the isothermal-sphere Lane– Emden equation. We do not follow the habitual approach of the literature based on the prescription of the central density as boundary condition; we impose the gravitational field at the solid-shell internal wall. As the discourse develops, we point out differences and similarities between the literature’s and our approach. We show that the nondimensional formulation of the problem hinges on a unique physical characteristic number that we call gravitational number because it gauges the self-gravity effects on the gas’ fluid statics. We illustrate and discuss numerical results; some peculiarities, such as gravitational-number upper bound and multiple solutions, lead us to investigate the thermodynamics of the physical system, particularly entropy and energy, and preliminarily explore whether or not thermodynamic-stability reasons could provide justification for either selection or exclusion of multiple solutions. We close the paper with a summary of the present study in which we draw conclusions and describe future work.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11586/231007
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