OBJECTIVES: Minimally invasive techniques seem to be promising alternatives to open approaches in the surgical treatment of early-stage thymoma, although there are controversies because of lack of data on long-term results. The aim of the study was to evaluate the surgical and oncological results after robotic thymectomy for early-stage thymoma compared to median sternotomy.METHODS: Between 1982 and 2017, 164 patients with early-stage thymoma (Masaoka I and II) were operated on by median sternotomy (108 patients) or the robotic approach (56 patients). Duration of surgery, amount of blood loss, complications, duration of chest drainage, postoperative hospital stay, oncological results and total costs were retrospectively evaluated. Data were analysed also after propensity score matching.RESULTS: Compared to the trans-sternal group, robotic thymectomy had significantly longer average operative times (P < 0.001) but less intraoperative blood loss (P = 0.01), less perioperative complications (P = 0.03), shorter time to chest drainage removal and hospital discharge (P < 0.001). The median expense for the trans-sternal approach was significantly higher than the cost of the robotic procedure (P < 0.001), mainly due to longer hospitalization. From an oncological point of view, there were no differences in thymoma recurrence, although follow-up of the trans-sternal group was significantly longer (P < 0.001). Data were confirmed after propensity score matching.CONCLUSIONS: Robotic thymectomy for early-stage thymoma is a technically safe and feasible procedure with low complication rate and shorter hospital stay compared to the trans-sternal approach. Cost analysis revealed lower expenses for the robotic procedure due to the reduced hospital stay. The oncological outcomes seemed comparable, but longer follow-up is needed.

Comparing robotic and trans-sternal thymectomy for early-stage thymoma: a propensity score-matching study

Marulli, Giuseppe;
2018

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Minimally invasive techniques seem to be promising alternatives to open approaches in the surgical treatment of early-stage thymoma, although there are controversies because of lack of data on long-term results. The aim of the study was to evaluate the surgical and oncological results after robotic thymectomy for early-stage thymoma compared to median sternotomy.METHODS: Between 1982 and 2017, 164 patients with early-stage thymoma (Masaoka I and II) were operated on by median sternotomy (108 patients) or the robotic approach (56 patients). Duration of surgery, amount of blood loss, complications, duration of chest drainage, postoperative hospital stay, oncological results and total costs were retrospectively evaluated. Data were analysed also after propensity score matching.RESULTS: Compared to the trans-sternal group, robotic thymectomy had significantly longer average operative times (P < 0.001) but less intraoperative blood loss (P = 0.01), less perioperative complications (P = 0.03), shorter time to chest drainage removal and hospital discharge (P < 0.001). The median expense for the trans-sternal approach was significantly higher than the cost of the robotic procedure (P < 0.001), mainly due to longer hospitalization. From an oncological point of view, there were no differences in thymoma recurrence, although follow-up of the trans-sternal group was significantly longer (P < 0.001). Data were confirmed after propensity score matching.CONCLUSIONS: Robotic thymectomy for early-stage thymoma is a technically safe and feasible procedure with low complication rate and shorter hospital stay compared to the trans-sternal approach. Cost analysis revealed lower expenses for the robotic procedure due to the reduced hospital stay. The oncological outcomes seemed comparable, but longer follow-up is needed.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11586/230280
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