Resistance training (RT) is the primary exercise intervention for increasing muscle strength in humans. However, to our knowledge, it is not clear whether it is better to train muscle strength with high-loads and low volumes or with high-intensity without drastic volume reductions. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effects of a high-load RT compared to Pyramid training system on muscular strength in experienced young men. Twenty participants (age: 23.9 ± 2.0 years; body mass: 75.6 ± 9.4 kg; height: 1.77 ± 0.05 m; RT experience: 4.1 ± 3.4 years) were pair-matched based on initial strength capacity and then randomly assigned to an experimental group (n = 10) performing high-load RT (80-95% 1-RM, 3-min rest) twice a week interspersed with a Pyramid training weekly session, or a Pyramid training group (n = 10) performing tri-weekly training sessions with Pyramid method alone (90-sec rest). Both groups trained for 8 weeks using a 3:1 loading structure. Measures pre-intervention and post-intervention included one-repetition maximum [1-RM] barbell bench press, barbell deadlift, lat pull-down, and standing barbell military press. Repeated-measures ANOVA and a paired t-test were used for statistical analyses (p < 0.05). Significant ‘Time x Group’ interaction was found for all the outcome variables (p < 0.0001) and the experimental group showed significantly greater improvements than Pyramid group (p < 0.0001) in bench press (+13.1 vs. +3.7 kg), deadlifts (+19.3 vs. +5.3 kg), pull-down (+17.2 vs. +2.8 kg) and military press (+13.1 vs. +1.9 kg). These findings suggest that high-load RT is an effective method to promote positive short-term adaptations of muscular strength in well-trained young men. To use a combination of different RT systems over time may help to maintain interest in and motivation to perform RT by allowing a varied RT program.

Effects of high-load resistance training versus pyramid training system on maximal muscle strength in well-trained young men: a randomized controlled study

FISCHETTI FRANCESCO;GRECO GIANPIERO
2019-01-01

Abstract

Resistance training (RT) is the primary exercise intervention for increasing muscle strength in humans. However, to our knowledge, it is not clear whether it is better to train muscle strength with high-loads and low volumes or with high-intensity without drastic volume reductions. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effects of a high-load RT compared to Pyramid training system on muscular strength in experienced young men. Twenty participants (age: 23.9 ± 2.0 years; body mass: 75.6 ± 9.4 kg; height: 1.77 ± 0.05 m; RT experience: 4.1 ± 3.4 years) were pair-matched based on initial strength capacity and then randomly assigned to an experimental group (n = 10) performing high-load RT (80-95% 1-RM, 3-min rest) twice a week interspersed with a Pyramid training weekly session, or a Pyramid training group (n = 10) performing tri-weekly training sessions with Pyramid method alone (90-sec rest). Both groups trained for 8 weeks using a 3:1 loading structure. Measures pre-intervention and post-intervention included one-repetition maximum [1-RM] barbell bench press, barbell deadlift, lat pull-down, and standing barbell military press. Repeated-measures ANOVA and a paired t-test were used for statistical analyses (p < 0.05). Significant ‘Time x Group’ interaction was found for all the outcome variables (p < 0.0001) and the experimental group showed significantly greater improvements than Pyramid group (p < 0.0001) in bench press (+13.1 vs. +3.7 kg), deadlifts (+19.3 vs. +5.3 kg), pull-down (+17.2 vs. +2.8 kg) and military press (+13.1 vs. +1.9 kg). These findings suggest that high-load RT is an effective method to promote positive short-term adaptations of muscular strength in well-trained young men. To use a combination of different RT systems over time may help to maintain interest in and motivation to perform RT by allowing a varied RT program.
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
Fischetti Camporeale Greco 2019.pdf

accesso aperto

Tipologia: Documento in Versione Editoriale
Licenza: NON PUBBLICO - Accesso privato/ristretto
Dimensione 156.85 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
156.85 kB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11586/225314
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 7
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact