Background: The gold standard treatment of symptomatic cholelithiasis is videolaparoscopic cholecystectomy (VLC). The aim of this study is to produce a predictive clinical ultrasound (US) score for difficult VLC to reduce the rate of conversion to open cholecystectomy surgery and intra and/or post-operative complications. Methods: In this prospective study carried out in 2017 we enrolled 135 patients (pts) who underwent VLC in our General Surgery Unit. A specific pre-operative abdominal ultrasound scan was performed to assess gallbladder characteristics for each patient. All US and patients' characteristics were recorded in a standard form in order to obtain a preoperative score and were then added to the intra-operative variables. Results: The analysis revealed a statistical significance between post-operative characteristics and parietal thickness, adhesions, stratifications and volume of gallstones. Comparing the degree of difficulty VLC assessed in the pre-operative stage to the intraoperative score, the sensitivity of the preoperative US scan test is 91.8% while the specificity is 76.7%. Conclusions: The variables which proved statistically significant in predicting a difficult cholecystectomy were: age, parietal thickness >3 mm, adhesions, stratifications, gallstones >2 cm and fixed gallstones. We have definitively defined a predictive score for difficult VLC for which a VLC is to be considered potentially difficult whenever it presents a pre-operative score equal or greater than 4 (and a “easy” one with a pre-operative score less than 4). These findings may prove helpful in further reducing the conversion rate and the rate of intra- and/or post-operative complications.

A new clinical-ultrasound score to predict difficult videolaparocholecystectomies: A prospective study

Carbotta, G;Panebianco, A;Laforgia, R;Pascazio, B;Bianchi, FP;Tafuri, S;Palasciano, N.
2018

Abstract

Background: The gold standard treatment of symptomatic cholelithiasis is videolaparoscopic cholecystectomy (VLC). The aim of this study is to produce a predictive clinical ultrasound (US) score for difficult VLC to reduce the rate of conversion to open cholecystectomy surgery and intra and/or post-operative complications. Methods: In this prospective study carried out in 2017 we enrolled 135 patients (pts) who underwent VLC in our General Surgery Unit. A specific pre-operative abdominal ultrasound scan was performed to assess gallbladder characteristics for each patient. All US and patients' characteristics were recorded in a standard form in order to obtain a preoperative score and were then added to the intra-operative variables. Results: The analysis revealed a statistical significance between post-operative characteristics and parietal thickness, adhesions, stratifications and volume of gallstones. Comparing the degree of difficulty VLC assessed in the pre-operative stage to the intraoperative score, the sensitivity of the preoperative US scan test is 91.8% while the specificity is 76.7%. Conclusions: The variables which proved statistically significant in predicting a difficult cholecystectomy were: age, parietal thickness >3 mm, adhesions, stratifications, gallstones >2 cm and fixed gallstones. We have definitively defined a predictive score for difficult VLC for which a VLC is to be considered potentially difficult whenever it presents a pre-operative score equal or greater than 4 (and a “easy” one with a pre-operative score less than 4). These findings may prove helpful in further reducing the conversion rate and the rate of intra- and/or post-operative complications.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11586/223184
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