Monoamine oxidase (MAO), a mitochondrial enzyme that oxidizes biogenic amines generating hydrogen peroxide, is a major source of oxidative stress in cardiac injury. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying its overactivation in pathological conditions are still poorly characterized. Here, we investigated whether the enhanced MAO-dependent hydrogen peroxide production can be due to increased substrate availability using a metabolomic profiling method. We identified N1-methylhistamine -the main catabolite of histamine- as an important substrate fueling MAO in Langendorff mouse hearts, directly perfused with a buffer containing hydrogen peroxide or subjected to ischemia/reperfusion protocol. Indeed, when these hearts were pretreated with the MAO inhibitor pargyline we observed N1-methylhistamine accumulation along with reduced oxidative stress. Next, we showed that synaptic terminals are the major source of N1-methylhistamine. Indeed, in vivo sympathectomy caused a decrease of N1-methylhistamine levels, which was associated with a marked protection in post-ischemic reperfused hearts. As far as the mechanism is concerned, we demonstrate that exogenous histamine is transported into isolated cardiomyocytes and triggers a rise in the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Once again, pargyline pretreatment induced intracellular accumulation of N1-methylhistamine along with decrease in ROS levels. These findings uncover a receptor-independent mechanism for histamine in cardiomyocytes. In summary, our study reveals a novel and important pathophysiological causative link between MAO activation and histamine availability during pathophysiological conditions such as oxidative stress/cardiac injury.

Monoamine oxidase-dependent histamine catabolism accounts for post-ischemic cardiac redox imbalance and injury

Scarcia, Pasquale;Porcelli, Vito;Gissi, Rosanna;Castegna, Alessandra;
2018-01-01

Abstract

Monoamine oxidase (MAO), a mitochondrial enzyme that oxidizes biogenic amines generating hydrogen peroxide, is a major source of oxidative stress in cardiac injury. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying its overactivation in pathological conditions are still poorly characterized. Here, we investigated whether the enhanced MAO-dependent hydrogen peroxide production can be due to increased substrate availability using a metabolomic profiling method. We identified N1-methylhistamine -the main catabolite of histamine- as an important substrate fueling MAO in Langendorff mouse hearts, directly perfused with a buffer containing hydrogen peroxide or subjected to ischemia/reperfusion protocol. Indeed, when these hearts were pretreated with the MAO inhibitor pargyline we observed N1-methylhistamine accumulation along with reduced oxidative stress. Next, we showed that synaptic terminals are the major source of N1-methylhistamine. Indeed, in vivo sympathectomy caused a decrease of N1-methylhistamine levels, which was associated with a marked protection in post-ischemic reperfused hearts. As far as the mechanism is concerned, we demonstrate that exogenous histamine is transported into isolated cardiomyocytes and triggers a rise in the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Once again, pargyline pretreatment induced intracellular accumulation of N1-methylhistamine along with decrease in ROS levels. These findings uncover a receptor-independent mechanism for histamine in cardiomyocytes. In summary, our study reveals a novel and important pathophysiological causative link between MAO activation and histamine availability during pathophysiological conditions such as oxidative stress/cardiac injury.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11586/219106
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