A simple fabrication approach for achieving nanoparticle patterns based on a room temperature chemically driven strategy is reported. Suitably engineered colloidal luminescent nanocrystals (NCs) (4 and 6 nm in diameter), namely organic capped and silica-coated negatively charged CdSe@ZnS NCs, have been selectively assembled onto defined domains in a binary hydrophobic/hydrophilic chemical pattern, purposely fabricated by combining microcontact printing and wet chemistry procedures. The goal of the work has been to investigate the experimental parameters governing the assembly process at molecular level, in order to elucidate factors regulating interactions at the interfaces. For this purpose, specific sets of conditions, namely substrate patterns and NCs with distinct surface functionalization, have been prepared and tested using different NC dispersing solvents. The NC assembly has been demonstrated driven by non-covalent forces, namely Van der Waals or electrostatic interactions occurring at the NC/substrate interface. The overall study has provided a comprehensive understanding of the role of solvent and molecular chemistry at interfaces in NC assembling. The obtained results can be valuable to set up reliable procedures for developing reproducible patterning protocols potentially useful for the fabrication of NC-based devices. © 2014 Springer Science+Business Media.

Patterned assembly of luminescent nanocrystals: Role of the molecular chemistry at the interface

Altomare, Michele;Fanizza, Elisabetta;Corricelli, Michela;Comparelli, Roberto;Curri, Maria Lucia
2014

Abstract

A simple fabrication approach for achieving nanoparticle patterns based on a room temperature chemically driven strategy is reported. Suitably engineered colloidal luminescent nanocrystals (NCs) (4 and 6 nm in diameter), namely organic capped and silica-coated negatively charged CdSe@ZnS NCs, have been selectively assembled onto defined domains in a binary hydrophobic/hydrophilic chemical pattern, purposely fabricated by combining microcontact printing and wet chemistry procedures. The goal of the work has been to investigate the experimental parameters governing the assembly process at molecular level, in order to elucidate factors regulating interactions at the interfaces. For this purpose, specific sets of conditions, namely substrate patterns and NCs with distinct surface functionalization, have been prepared and tested using different NC dispersing solvents. The NC assembly has been demonstrated driven by non-covalent forces, namely Van der Waals or electrostatic interactions occurring at the NC/substrate interface. The overall study has provided a comprehensive understanding of the role of solvent and molecular chemistry at interfaces in NC assembling. The obtained results can be valuable to set up reliable procedures for developing reproducible patterning protocols potentially useful for the fabrication of NC-based devices. © 2014 Springer Science+Business Media.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11586/210250
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 5
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact