Tuckerella japonica Ehara (Acari: Tetranychoidea: Tuckerellidae) was found on stems of seedling plants of Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze (Theaceae) in the continental USA. This mite is able to pierce exposed green periderm tissue with its paired stylets on 1- to 3- or 4-year-old stems where the outer bark had split longitudinally. The mite was not found on branches older than 3 or 4 years, where splitting diminished and, eventually, a uniform covering of bark was formed. The mouthparts of T. japonica were examined under scanning electron microscopy and their external morphology was compared with known Tetranychoidea. There were usually one or two feeding holes in an area where the female subsequently deposited one or more eggs. Females were observed defending the areas where their eggs and/or young occurred. This behavior along with potentially limited access to exposed periderm or availability of shoots in the rows of plants may restrict higher populations of T. japonica from becoming established. The potential of T. japonica as an economic pest remains unknown at this time.

External morphology of the mouthparts and observations on behavior of Tuckerella japonica on Camellia sinensis in the continental USA

de Lillo, Enrico;
2018

Abstract

Tuckerella japonica Ehara (Acari: Tetranychoidea: Tuckerellidae) was found on stems of seedling plants of Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze (Theaceae) in the continental USA. This mite is able to pierce exposed green periderm tissue with its paired stylets on 1- to 3- or 4-year-old stems where the outer bark had split longitudinally. The mite was not found on branches older than 3 or 4 years, where splitting diminished and, eventually, a uniform covering of bark was formed. The mouthparts of T. japonica were examined under scanning electron microscopy and their external morphology was compared with known Tetranychoidea. There were usually one or two feeding holes in an area where the female subsequently deposited one or more eggs. Females were observed defending the areas where their eggs and/or young occurred. This behavior along with potentially limited access to exposed periderm or availability of shoots in the rows of plants may restrict higher populations of T. japonica from becoming established. The potential of T. japonica as an economic pest remains unknown at this time.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11586/209719
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