Background. Subcutaneous administration of hepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIg) is effective in preventing hepatitis B virus (HBV) recurrence after liver transplantation, but early conversion to subcutaneous administration is undocumented. Methods. In a prospective study, patients transplanted for terminal liver disease due to HBV infection who were HBV DNA-negative at transplant were switched by week 3 posttransplantation from intravenous to subcutaneous HBIg (500 or 1000 IU weekly or fortnightly, adjusted according to serumanti-HBs trough level) if they were HBsAg- and HBV-DNA negative at time of switch. All patients concomitantly received nucleos(t)ide analogue antiviral therapy. Primary endpoint was failure rate by month 6, defined as serum anti- HBs of 100 IU/L or less or HBV reinfection despite serum anti-HBs greater than 100 IU/L. Results. Of 49 patients treated, 47 (95.9%) continued treatment until month 6. All patients achieved administration by a caregiver or self-injection by week 14. No treatment failures occurred. Mean anti-HBs declined progressively to month 6, plateauing at a protective titer of approximately 290 IU/L. All patients tested for HBV DNA remained negative (45/45). Only 1 adverse event (mild injection site hematoma) was assessed as treatment-related. Conclusions. Introduction of subcutaneous HBIg administration by week 3 posttransplantation, combined with HBV virostatic prophylaxis, is effective and convenient for preventing HBV recurrence.

Early introduction of subcutaneous hepatitis B immunoglobulin following liver transplantation for hepatitis B virus infection: A prospective, multicenter study

TANDOI, FRANCESCO;LUPO, Luigi Giovanni;
2016-01-01

Abstract

Background. Subcutaneous administration of hepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIg) is effective in preventing hepatitis B virus (HBV) recurrence after liver transplantation, but early conversion to subcutaneous administration is undocumented. Methods. In a prospective study, patients transplanted for terminal liver disease due to HBV infection who were HBV DNA-negative at transplant were switched by week 3 posttransplantation from intravenous to subcutaneous HBIg (500 or 1000 IU weekly or fortnightly, adjusted according to serumanti-HBs trough level) if they were HBsAg- and HBV-DNA negative at time of switch. All patients concomitantly received nucleos(t)ide analogue antiviral therapy. Primary endpoint was failure rate by month 6, defined as serum anti- HBs of 100 IU/L or less or HBV reinfection despite serum anti-HBs greater than 100 IU/L. Results. Of 49 patients treated, 47 (95.9%) continued treatment until month 6. All patients achieved administration by a caregiver or self-injection by week 14. No treatment failures occurred. Mean anti-HBs declined progressively to month 6, plateauing at a protective titer of approximately 290 IU/L. All patients tested for HBV DNA remained negative (45/45). Only 1 adverse event (mild injection site hematoma) was assessed as treatment-related. Conclusions. Introduction of subcutaneous HBIg administration by week 3 posttransplantation, combined with HBV virostatic prophylaxis, is effective and convenient for preventing HBV recurrence.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11586/194165
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