Background and aims: Since treatment with insulin detemir results in a lower weight gain compared to human insulin, we investigated whether detemir is associated with lower ability to promote adipogenesis and/or lipogenesis in human adipose stem cells (ASC). Methods and results: Human ASC isolated from both the subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissues were differentiated for 30 days in the presence of human insulin or insulin detemir. Nile Red and Oil-Red-O staining were used to quantify the rate of ASC conversion to adipocytes and lipid accumulation, respectively. mRNA expression levels of early genes, including Fos and Cebpb, as well as of lipogenic and adipogenic genes, were measured at various phases of differentiation by qRT-PCR. Activation of insulin signaling was assessed by immunoblotting. ASC isolated from subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue were less differentiated when exposed to insulin detemir compared to human insulin, showing lower rates of adipocyte conversion, reduced triglyceride accumulation, and impaired expression of late-phase adipocyte marker genes, such as Pparg2, Slc2a4, Adipoq, and Cidec. However, no differences in activation of insulin receptor, Akt and Erk and induction of the early genes Fos and Cebpb were observed between insulin detemir and human insulin. Conclusion: Insulin detemir displays reduced induction of the Pparg2 adipocyte master gene and diminished effects on adipocyte differentiation and lipogenesis in human subcutaneous and visceral ASC, in spite of normal activation of proximal insulin signaling reactions. These characteristics of insulin detemir may be of potential relevance to its weight-sparing effects observed in the clinical setting.

Long-acting insulin analog detemir displays reduced effects on adipocyte differentiation of human subcutaneous and visceral adipose stem cells

CIGNARELLI, ANGELO;PERRINI, SEBASTIO;NIGRO, PASQUALE;FICARELLA, ROMINA;BARBARO, MARIA;PESCHECHERA, ALESSANDRO;PORRO, STEFANIA;NATALICCHIO, ANNALISA;LAVIOLA, Luigi;PUGLISI, Francesco;GIORGINO, Francesco
2016-01-01

Abstract

Background and aims: Since treatment with insulin detemir results in a lower weight gain compared to human insulin, we investigated whether detemir is associated with lower ability to promote adipogenesis and/or lipogenesis in human adipose stem cells (ASC). Methods and results: Human ASC isolated from both the subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissues were differentiated for 30 days in the presence of human insulin or insulin detemir. Nile Red and Oil-Red-O staining were used to quantify the rate of ASC conversion to adipocytes and lipid accumulation, respectively. mRNA expression levels of early genes, including Fos and Cebpb, as well as of lipogenic and adipogenic genes, were measured at various phases of differentiation by qRT-PCR. Activation of insulin signaling was assessed by immunoblotting. ASC isolated from subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue were less differentiated when exposed to insulin detemir compared to human insulin, showing lower rates of adipocyte conversion, reduced triglyceride accumulation, and impaired expression of late-phase adipocyte marker genes, such as Pparg2, Slc2a4, Adipoq, and Cidec. However, no differences in activation of insulin receptor, Akt and Erk and induction of the early genes Fos and Cebpb were observed between insulin detemir and human insulin. Conclusion: Insulin detemir displays reduced induction of the Pparg2 adipocyte master gene and diminished effects on adipocyte differentiation and lipogenesis in human subcutaneous and visceral ASC, in spite of normal activation of proximal insulin signaling reactions. These characteristics of insulin detemir may be of potential relevance to its weight-sparing effects observed in the clinical setting.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11586/170388
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