The role of Musca domestica Linnaeus as a vector of the dermatophyte Microsporum canis was investigated under experimental laboratory conditions. About 400 4-day-old M. domestica flies were divided into two groups. Group A consisted of about 200 infected flies and group B comprised about 200 uninfected flies that were used as controls. Each trial was run three times. Flies from group A were fed for 24 h with a solution of ultra-high temperature-treated (UHT) milk containing about 10(6) colony-forming units (CFU) per mL of M. canis (infected milk inoculum [IMI]). The control group (group B) was fed with only UHT milk spiked with a teaspoon of honey. Microsporum canis was detected from faeces, vomitus, external surfaces and internal organs of 20 adult flies, eggs, first-, second- and third-stage (L1, L2, L3) larvae and pupae of each group, as well from 20 adult newly emerged flies (NEFs; from infected generations only). Samples were collected at 2, 4, 6 and 24 h post-infection (p.i.) (i.e. the times at which IMI was available) and on 2, 5, 7 and 8 days p.i. from adult flies, faeces and vomitus. Eggs, L1, L2, L3 and pupae were processed as soon as they appeared. Equivalent samples were taken from group B. All the samples were individually cultured. Microsporum canis was not isolated from the control group, from eggs, larvae, pupae or NEFs, or from faeces and vomitus, although it was detected on the body surface (26.2%) and internal organs (26.9%) of adult flies. The highest positivity for M. canis was detected on flies within the first 6 h p.i. (i.e. 57.2% on the body surface and 71.6% in the internal organs). No M. canis was isolated at 24 h p.i., but it was isolated from the body surface only at 2 and 5 days p.i. The results presented provide evidence that M. domestica transmits M. canis mechanically with its outer body surface for up to 5 days p.i., but does not do so through its vomitus and faeces or transovarially. The role played by M. domestica in the epidemiology of human and animal dermatophytoses is discussed.

Competence of the housefly Musca domestica as vector of Microsporum canis under experimental conditions

CAFARCHIA, Claudia;LIA, Riccardo Paolo;ROMITO, DIANA;OTRANTO, Domenico
2009

Abstract

The role of Musca domestica Linnaeus as a vector of the dermatophyte Microsporum canis was investigated under experimental laboratory conditions. About 400 4-day-old M. domestica flies were divided into two groups. Group A consisted of about 200 infected flies and group B comprised about 200 uninfected flies that were used as controls. Each trial was run three times. Flies from group A were fed for 24 h with a solution of ultra-high temperature-treated (UHT) milk containing about 10(6) colony-forming units (CFU) per mL of M. canis (infected milk inoculum [IMI]). The control group (group B) was fed with only UHT milk spiked with a teaspoon of honey. Microsporum canis was detected from faeces, vomitus, external surfaces and internal organs of 20 adult flies, eggs, first-, second- and third-stage (L1, L2, L3) larvae and pupae of each group, as well from 20 adult newly emerged flies (NEFs; from infected generations only). Samples were collected at 2, 4, 6 and 24 h post-infection (p.i.) (i.e. the times at which IMI was available) and on 2, 5, 7 and 8 days p.i. from adult flies, faeces and vomitus. Eggs, L1, L2, L3 and pupae were processed as soon as they appeared. Equivalent samples were taken from group B. All the samples were individually cultured. Microsporum canis was not isolated from the control group, from eggs, larvae, pupae or NEFs, or from faeces and vomitus, although it was detected on the body surface (26.2%) and internal organs (26.9%) of adult flies. The highest positivity for M. canis was detected on flies within the first 6 h p.i. (i.e. 57.2% on the body surface and 71.6% in the internal organs). No M. canis was isolated at 24 h p.i., but it was isolated from the body surface only at 2 and 5 days p.i. The results presented provide evidence that M. domestica transmits M. canis mechanically with its outer body surface for up to 5 days p.i., but does not do so through its vomitus and faeces or transovarially. The role played by M. domestica in the epidemiology of human and animal dermatophytoses is discussed.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11586/133629
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