Previous studies of the pericentromeric region of the human X chromosome short arm (Xp) revealed an age gradient from ancient DNA that contains expressed genes to recent human-specific DNA at the functional centromere. We analyzed the finished sequence of this human genomic region to investigate its evolutionary history. Phylogenetic analysis of >1,500 alpha-satellite monomers from the region revealed the presence of five physical domains, each containing monomers from a distinct phylogenetic clade. The most distal domain contains long interspersed nucleotide element repeats that were active >35 million years ago, whereas the four proximal domains contain more recently active long interspersed nucleotide element repeats. An out-of-register, unequal recombination (i.e., crossover) detected at the edge of the X chromosome-specific alpha-satellite array (DXZ1) may reflect the most recent of a series of punctuating events during evolution that resulted in a proximal physical expansion of the X centromere. The first 18 kb of this array has 97-99% pairwise identity among all 2-kb repeat units. To perform more detailed evolutionary comparisons, we sequenced the junction between the ancient DNA of Xp and the primate-specific alpha satellite in chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, vervet, macaque, and baboon. The striking conservation found in all cases supports the ancestral nature of the alpha satellite at this location. These studies demonstrate that the primate X centromere appears to have evolved through repeated expansion events occurring within the central, active region of centromeric DNA, with the newly added sequences then conferring centromere function.

Progressive proximal expansion of the primate X chromosome centromere

VIGGIANO, Luigi;ROCCHI, Mariano;
2005

Abstract

Previous studies of the pericentromeric region of the human X chromosome short arm (Xp) revealed an age gradient from ancient DNA that contains expressed genes to recent human-specific DNA at the functional centromere. We analyzed the finished sequence of this human genomic region to investigate its evolutionary history. Phylogenetic analysis of >1,500 alpha-satellite monomers from the region revealed the presence of five physical domains, each containing monomers from a distinct phylogenetic clade. The most distal domain contains long interspersed nucleotide element repeats that were active >35 million years ago, whereas the four proximal domains contain more recently active long interspersed nucleotide element repeats. An out-of-register, unequal recombination (i.e., crossover) detected at the edge of the X chromosome-specific alpha-satellite array (DXZ1) may reflect the most recent of a series of punctuating events during evolution that resulted in a proximal physical expansion of the X centromere. The first 18 kb of this array has 97-99% pairwise identity among all 2-kb repeat units. To perform more detailed evolutionary comparisons, we sequenced the junction between the ancient DNA of Xp and the primate-specific alpha satellite in chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, vervet, macaque, and baboon. The striking conservation found in all cases supports the ancestral nature of the alpha satellite at this location. These studies demonstrate that the primate X centromere appears to have evolved through repeated expansion events occurring within the central, active region of centromeric DNA, with the newly added sequences then conferring centromere function.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11586/127210
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