OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the ability of a high-cell-passage canine coronavirus vaccine to immunise dogs against challenge with a field isolate of the virus. METHODS: Three dogs that had previously tested seronegative and virus-negative for canine coronavirus were inoculated twice, at 21-day intervals, with the vaccine and kept under observation. Two seronegative and virus-negative dogs served as unvaccinated controls. For safety tests, two additional dogs were inoculated oronasally with 10 times the vaccinal dose and no reactions were observed. Faecal samples were collected daily from the vaccinated dogs after the first and second inoculations. Both vaccinated and control dogs were challenged two weeks after the second vaccination with a field canine coronavirus strain. Blood samples were collected for serological tests before vaccination and at weekly intervals after vaccinations and challenge. RESULTS: Virus was not detected in faecal samples after the first or second vaccinations by virus isolation assays and PCR. Significantly, the vaccinated dogs did not have clinical signs after challenge and no virus shedding was observed. The two unvaccinated control dogs had moderate enteritis, and virus was detected in cell cultures starting from three days postchallenge (dog 1) and two days postchallenge (dog 2), and by PCR for 23 median days. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: This study showed the efficacy of a high-cell-passage canine coronavirus vaccine in preventing infection of dogs by virulent virus and, specifically, its ability to induce sterilising immunity.

High cell passaged canine coronavirus vaccine providing sterile immunity

PRATELLI, Annamaria
2007

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the ability of a high-cell-passage canine coronavirus vaccine to immunise dogs against challenge with a field isolate of the virus. METHODS: Three dogs that had previously tested seronegative and virus-negative for canine coronavirus were inoculated twice, at 21-day intervals, with the vaccine and kept under observation. Two seronegative and virus-negative dogs served as unvaccinated controls. For safety tests, two additional dogs were inoculated oronasally with 10 times the vaccinal dose and no reactions were observed. Faecal samples were collected daily from the vaccinated dogs after the first and second inoculations. Both vaccinated and control dogs were challenged two weeks after the second vaccination with a field canine coronavirus strain. Blood samples were collected for serological tests before vaccination and at weekly intervals after vaccinations and challenge. RESULTS: Virus was not detected in faecal samples after the first or second vaccinations by virus isolation assays and PCR. Significantly, the vaccinated dogs did not have clinical signs after challenge and no virus shedding was observed. The two unvaccinated control dogs had moderate enteritis, and virus was detected in cell cultures starting from three days postchallenge (dog 1) and two days postchallenge (dog 2), and by PCR for 23 median days. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: This study showed the efficacy of a high-cell-passage canine coronavirus vaccine in preventing infection of dogs by virulent virus and, specifically, its ability to induce sterilising immunity.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11586/11355
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